Chemistry

CHEM 105. The World of Chemistry (Staff)
Designed to provide nonscience majors with a basic understanding of chemistry and how this knowledge can be useful and important in their daily lives. No laboratory. F. May not be taken for credit after successful completion of CHEM 110. (Group II)

CHEM 110. General Chemistry I (1.25 units; Staff)
A comprehensive survey of the principles of chemistry, including such topics as atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, states of matter, and thermochemistry. The laboratory experiments are designed to illustrate and reinforce the topics covered in lecture. F. (Group II)

CHEM 111. General Chemistry II (1.25 units; Staff)
A continuation of survey of the principles of chemistry, including such topics as solutions, various equilibrium systems, kinetics, main group elements, transition metals and coordination chemistry, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. The laboratory experiments are designed to illustrate and reinforce the topics covered in lecture. Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 110. S. (Group II, Quantitative)

CHEM 230. Environmental Chemistry (Staff)
(Not offered Spring 2017)
The course focuses on the connection between chemistry and society. Environmental issues such as pollution, ozone-depletion, and the Greenhouse Effect will be examined with respect to the chemistry involved and their effect on society. In addition, the role of current public policy in addressing environmental degradation will be addressed. S. (Group II)

CHEM 260. Organic Chemistry I (1.25 units; Lever, Thomas)
A study of the relationship between the structures of organic molecules and their physical and chemical properties. An emphasis is placed upon the understanding of reaction mechanisms, the identification of compounds by spectroscopic techniques, and the use of reactions to prepare desired compounds. The laboratory includes compound preparations and purifications, the study of reaction mechanisms, and molecular modeling. Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 111. F. (Group II)

CHEM 261. Organic Chemistry II (1.25 units; Lever, Thomas)
Continuation, with special projects. Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 260. S. (Group II)

CHEM 270. Analytical Chemistry (1.25 units; Grunkemeyer)
Introduction to the fundamental principles and methodology of chemical analysis. Topics include statistics, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, and an introduction to instrumental analysis. Laboratory focuses on experimental techniques for quantitative measurements and careful evaluation of data. Prerequisites: CHEM 111, MATH 110. Recommended: CHEM 260. S. (Group II)

CHEM 340. Biochemistry I (1.25 units; Vogt)
A study of the structure and function of major classes of biomolecules including peptides, proteins, enzymes, coenzymes, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleotides, and nucleic acids. Membranes and the storage and transmission of genetic information are also examined. In addition, current biochemical techniques and their applications are examined. The laboratory provides experience with current biochemical procedures. Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 261. Accelerated summer organic chemistry courses will not be accepted as a substitute for the CHEM 261 prerequisite for this course. F. (Group II)

CHEM 341. Biochemistry II (Vogt)
A continuation of Biochemistry I, the principles of which are used in an examination of membrane transport, signal transduction, bioenergetics, and intermediary metabolism. Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 340. S. (Group II)

CHEM 350. Physical Chemistry I (Brugh)
An introduction to quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, and bonding applied to understanding chemical systems. Mathematical model building using Mathematica is emphasized throughout. Prerequisites: MATH 111, PHYS 111 (preferably) or PHYS 116, CHEM 261 or consent of instructor. F. (Group II)

CHEM 351. Physical Chemistry II (Brugh)
An introduction to statistical mechanics, classical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and dynamics applied to understanding chemical systems. Mathematical model building using Mathematica is emphasized throughout. Prerequisite: CHEM 350. S. (Group II)

CHEM 352. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (0.25 units; Brugh)
An introduction to the application of computational chemistry methods to investigating chemical problems using Gaussian. Prerequisite: CHEM 350. S.

CHEM 460. Instrumental Analysis (1.25 units; Grunkemeyer)
(Offered Fall 2017 and Fall 2019)
Theoretical concepts and practical applications of chemical instrumentation. The course will focus on the design of chemical instrumentation and the information that can be obtained from the resulting data. Topics include optical spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, NMR, electrochemistry, and chromatography. Laboratory work focuses on gaining the skills required to solve chemical problems using instrumental techniques. Prerequisite: CHEM 270; CHEM 350 or consent of instructor. F. (Group II)

CHEM 470. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (1.25 units; Lance)
Survey of the chemistry of the elements with emphasis on structure, chemical bonding, and reactivity. Aspects of synthesis and characterization are dealt with both in lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM 261, CHEM 270; CHEM 350 or consent of instructor. S. (Group II)

CHEM 480. Advanced Topics in Chemistry (0.50 units; Staff)
An exploration of an area of chemistry developed beyond the introductory level. Topics will vary from semester to semester depending upon which professors are teaching the course that semester. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. F, S.

CHEM 490. Independent Study (Staff)
Investigation of an original research problem, including laboratory work, literature searches, and written reports. Prerequisite: consent of instructor prior to preregistration. F, S.

CHEM 491. Directed Readings (Staff)
Individually supervised surveys of selected chemical topics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor prior to preregistration. F, S.

CHEM 495. Internship (Staff)