Chinese

CHIN 100.1. Topics in Chinese Culture and Language Through Multimedia (Staff)
This course is designed for students who are interested in languages and culture in Chinese-speaking communities, including Taiwan, China, and Hong Kong. The class introduces different aspects of Chinese culture, such as philosophy, influential people, holidays, education, cinema, cuisine, and historical events. Students are also provided with the opportunity to learn commonly used Chinese phrases and proverbs. In addition, vocabulary words are introduced on a topic-related basis such as the Analects, to enhance students’ Chinese proficiency. The topics are presented to students through multimedia materials, i.e., video clips, images, music, and TV shows. S.

CHIN 110, CHIN 111. First Year Chinese I and II (Staff)
Introductory courses emphasizing four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Consideration of the cultural and historic background of the areas where the language is spoken is promoted, and readings are designed to introduce students to the cultures of the Chinese-speaking world. Emphasis is on class participation and active use of the language in a grammatically accurate and culturally appropriate fashion. The aim is to prepare students to achieve the Novice-mid level of the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) standard:

  • Listening: Understand key words and formulaic expressions from sentence-length speech in highly contextualized, predictable situations, such as greetings.
  • Speaking: Communicate by applying a number of isolated words and memorized phrases on very familiar, everyday topics that affect them directly, such as self-introduction.
  • Reading: Recognize approximately 300 frequently-used characters and understand predictable and formulaic phrases in highly contextualized texts and/or with extra-linguistic support, such as street signs and class schedules.
  • Writing: Demonstrate a high degree of accuracy when writing on very familiar topics using well-practiced language; able to recombine learned characters and structures to produce simple sentences, such as writing a postcard and short messages.

CHIN 225, CHIN 254. Second Year Chinese I and II (Staff)
Sequential courses following CHIN 110 and CHIN 111. These courses build upon the linguistic skills developed in CHIN 110 and CHIN 111, stressing improvement in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Consideration of the cultural and historic background of the areas where the language is spoken is further promoted, and readings are designed to advance students’ understanding of the cultures of the Chinese-speaking world. Emphasis is on class participation and active use of the language in a grammatically accurate and culturally appropriate fashion. The aim is to prepare students to achieve the Intermediate-low level of the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) standard:

  • Listening: Understand one utterance at a time in face-to-face conversations or in routine, highly contextualized listening tasks, such as straightforward announcements, simple directions, and high-frequency commands; reply on repetition, derive meaning from rephrasing and/or a slowed rate of speech.
  • Speaking: Converse in some concrete exchanges and familiar topics in straightforward social situations necessary for survival in Chinese-speaking communities, such as expressing their personal preferences and some immediate needs.
  • Reading: Comprehend loosely-connected texts that deliver basic information in non-complex and predictable pattern of presentation, such as online bulletin boards and forums; understand discourse that is primarily organized in individual sentences containing predominantly commonly-used vocabulary.
  • Writing: Meet some practical writing needs, such as short messages; craft simple conversational-style sentences with basic word order and repetitive structure; write on highly familiar content areas and personal information with adequate vocabulary to express elementary needs.

Prerequisite: CHIN 111 or permission of instructor

CHIN 310, CHIN 311. Third Year Chinese I and II (Staff)
Sequential courses following CHIN 225 and CHIN 254. These courses promote the acquisition of more advanced Chinese language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The cultural and historic background of the areas where the language is spoken is an integral part of this course, with a wider reading component imparting students varied and detailed knowledge of the cultures of the Chinese-speaking world. Emphasis is on class participation and active use of the language in a grammatically accurate and culturally appropriate fashion. The aim is to prepare students to achieve the Intermediate-high level of the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) standard:

  • Listening: Comprehend, with ease and confidence, simple sentence-length speech; derive substantial meaning from some basic connected social and personal discourse; require a controlled listening environment where they hear what they anticipate to hear, such as classroom instruction and story summaries.
  • Speaking: Communicate with ease and confidence during routine tasks and uncomplicated social situations related to their work, school, and areas of competence; form connected discourse of paragraph-length to narrate and describe in all major time frames, such as a birthday party.
  • Reading: Comprehend fully and with ease basic information conveyed in short, non-complex texts on personal and social topics to which the reader brings personal knowledge or interest; understand some connected texts of description and narration, such as a text that announces a house for sale.
  • Writing: Meet practical writing needs in paragraph-length texts, such as an email to request a meeting; describe and narrate everyday events and situations in a fashion generally comprehensible to natives.

Prerequisite: CHIN 254 or permission of instructor

CHIN 320, CHIN 321. Third Year Chinese Conversation I and II (Staff)
The class is delivered in Chinese. The focus is on development in students’ speaking and listening skills, including temporal fluency, grammatical accuracy, pronunciation, use of idioms, and culturally appropriate speaking manners. The course emphasizes three communicative modes (interpersonal, presentational, and interpretative) in students’ speaking and listening skills. Examples of class activities are presentations, group discussions, speeches, interpretations, debates, and role-plays. A wide range of conversational topics includes, for instance, culture, literature, environmental issues, science, politics, art, and the news. Both the mid-term and final exams are oral, and students’ speaking proficiency is evaluated on fluency, accuracy, word choice, and pronunciation. The aim is to prepare students to reach the Advanced-low level of the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) standard:

  • Listening: Derive meaning primarily from situational and subject-matter knowledge; comprehend lexically uncomplicated narration and description with underlying structure; process authentic, connected speech of several paragraphs length, such as a news report that does not require specialized knowledge on the part of the listener.
  • Speaking: Convey their intended message with sufficient accuracy, clarity, and precision; link sentences into connected discourse of paragraph length on topics relating to, for example, their employment, matters of public interest, academic life, and simple negotiations; understood by native speakers unaccustomed to speaking with non-native speakers with communicative strategies, such as restatement and circumlocution.

Prerequisite: CHIN 254 or permission of instructor. (Diversity)

CHIN 330, CHIN 331. Fourth Year Chinese I and II (Staff)
Sequential courses following CHIN 310 and CHIN 311 aimed at perfecting the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Consideration of the cultural and historic background of the areas where the language is spoken is presented at an advanced level, and is complemented through diverse readings on the rich cultures of the Chinese-speaking world. Emphasis is on class participation and active use of the language in a grammatically accurate and culturally appropriate fashion. The aim is to prepare students to achieve the Advanced-mid level of the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) standard:

  • Listening: Comprehend the main ideas and most supporting details in authentic, connected speech of concrete, conventional discourse on an array of general interest topics, such as news stories; be able to derive some meaning from unfamiliar topics.
  • Speaking: Convey their intended messages clearly in most informal and some formal situations on a variety of concrete topics, such as the real estate market in the speaker’s area; describe in the major time frames with a full account; rephrase to compensate for limitations in lexical and structural control of the Chinese language, for example by using general or generic vocabulary.
  • Reading: Comprehend texts with expanded descriptions of things and narrations about events in all major time frames; understand main ideas, facts, and details and predict what they are going to read in texts of the standard linguistic conventions of Chinese, such as a news article reporting on the result of laws allowing the government to recover the cost of rescuing people who attempt to suicide.
  • Writing: Meet a variety of work and academic writing needs, such as a term paper; write with a range of cohesive devices and syntactic structures in texts of several paragraphs in length; express main ideas and elaborate with supporting details; exhibit good control of high-frequency structures and generic vocabulary.

Prerequisite: CHIN 311 or permission of instructor.

CHIN 490. Independent Studies
Students will conduct research on the interested topics relating to Chinese language and culture. Students will read materials, present the results, and write their papers using Chinese. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. F, S.

CHIN 491. Directed Reading
Students will read Chinese texts that are written for native speakers of Chinese and approved by the supervising faculty member, meet with the professor to discuss the content, and write mid-term and final papers in Chinese. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. F, S.

CHIN 499. Seminar
Seminar on a topic within Chinese pedagogy, linguistics, culture, or literature for advanced students of Chinese. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. F, S. (Diversity)

French

FREN 110, FREN 111. Beginning French (Staff)
An introductory course emphasizing four basic skills: aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Consideration of the cultural and historic background of the areas where the language is spoken, and readings designed to introduce students to the cultures of the French-speaking world. The aim is to prepare students to speak and comprehend with some facility and to read texts of moderate difficulty. Emphasis is on class participation and active use of the language. F, S.

FREN 230. Continuing Toward Fluency (Lewis, Oancea, Staff)
This intermediate French language course provides a thorough review of French grammar through an exploration of issues relevant to young people in the Francophone world. It seeks to improve the students’ spoken and written mastery of the language, in addition to their reading and aural comprehension. At the end of this course, students will be able to converse with native speakers on everyday topics and express themselves flowingly in brief pieces of writing. Their interest in Francophone cultures will be fostered through the use of a variety of authentic materials, including film, music, newspaper and magazine articles, and brief literary texts. F, S.

FREN 241. French Language Practicum (0.25 unit; Lewis, Oancea)
A conversation practicum in which cultural and language topics are used as substance for class programs and projects. Students are required to speak French. Students wanting to satisfy the Modern Foreign Language House requirement should enroll in FREN 241 for the fall semester, FREN 242 for spring semester. FREN 241 may be repeated once for a total of 0.5 unit, not to be counted toward the major or minor. Prerequisite: FREN 225 or the equivalent. F.

FREN 242. French Language Practicum (0.25 units; Lewis, Oancea)
Continuation. FREN 242 may be repeated once for a total of 0.5 unit, not to be counted toward the major or minor. S.

FREN 250. Composition and Conversation: Topics From the French-Speaking World (Lewis, Oancea, Staff)
In FREN 250, students will build on what they learned in FREN 230. Through sustained engagement with texts and cultural artifacts from the French and Francophone world, they will also work toward honing their critical thinking, reading, writing, argumentation, and basic analysis skills in French. This class functions as a “bridge course” between more linguistically oriented courses and the literary and cultural seminars they will encounter at the 300 levels. Prerequisite: FREN 230. (Group III)

FREN 300.1. French Language Film: Le Cinéma de Langue Française (Oancea)
This course features French films selected from earliest cinematic history to the present time from France and other French-speaking regions of the world. Students will explore the interplay of image, story and sound track in representative film genres and directors. The course also focuses on movements of social identity and critical interpretations that continue to shape both films of fiction and documentary. Prerequisites: FREN 350 or FREN 351 or permission of instructor. F.

FREN 300.2. Paris in the French Imagination (Oancea)
The French capital has long been considered the birthplace of modernity. How do authors and artists construct its distinction? In what ways does their work draw on historical events and on the city’s rich culture? These questions guide our exploration of Parisian modernity through varied literary selections, films, photographs, and other documents. The city’s many facets will be presented through primary sources, which are linked thematically, and focus on topics such as the Eiffel Tower as a symbol, the boulevards and café culture, and Paris as the ideal place to realize one’s extraordinary ambitions. Prerequisite: FREN 350 or FREN 351.

FREN 300.3. The Captive and Captivity in Contemporary Francophone North African Literature (Lewis)
In this seminar, we explore the theme of captivity in the context of 20th and 21st century Francophone North Africa. Through close and critical readings and analysis of literary and critical texts as well as through the study of film, we will “think” captivity, and by extension, freedom and subjectivity, both epistemologically and aesthetically. Throughout this course, students will hone their critical thinking, argumentation, textual analysis, and writing skills and will continue to progress in their fluency in French. Prerequisite: FREN 350 or FREN 351. (Group III, Diversity)

FREN 300.4. Contemporary Franco-Arab Cultural Exchanges: Exploring the Literature and Film of French Expression From the Maghreb and Mashreq (Lewis)
In this seminar, we will study the relationships between France and the Arab world in the twentieth century through the analysis of literary and critical texts as well as through the study of film. Through close readings of Francophone texts and films from Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Lebanon, and Syria, students will engage with such questions as how to think and understand the role of the French language outside of France; the ways colonization and decolonization shape (or do not shape) these texts; how to understand postcolonial identity; and the manner in which an author’s (or auteur’s) politics, narrative, and aesthetics interact with one another. Throughout this course, students will hone their critical thinking, argumentation, textual analysis, and writing skills and will continue to progress in their fluency in French. Prerequisite: FREN 350 or FREN 351. (Group III, Diversity)

FREN 351. Introduction to Literatures of the French-Speaking World (Lewis, Oancea)
In this French discussion-based course, students discover major French and Francophone literary works of varied genres (poetry, theater, short story, novel, essay). These texts are explored in cultural and historical context, giving students a strong overview of the intellectual landscape in which they arose. Students practice different forms of analytical writing, using precise critical vocabulary, and are introduced to basic theory (literary, cultural, visual, etc.). (Group III, Diversity – only when concentration is Francophone literature studies course)

FREN 354. Phonetics (Lewis)
Systematic study of the French sound system with correction of pronunciation. Prerequisite: FREN 350 or FREN 351 or permission of instructor. S.

FREN 365. Culture of Rebellion (Oancea)
This course examines figures in French literature and culture who rebel against the artistic, political, or gender norms of their age. Examples will include the dangerous seductress, the damned poet, the mad scientist, and the enlightenment philosopher, with attention to the cultural and historical context in which they evolved. We will reflect on the individual’s relationship with and responsibility to society, while also considering various visions of creative freedom and intellectual property. We will establish connections between different historical periods, the classics and popular literature, and literature and other media. Prerequisite: FREN 350 or FREN 351 or permission of instructor. (Group III)

FREN 371. Topics in Prose of the Modern Period (Lewis, Oancea)
This course addresses the development of prose fiction in French literature during the 19th and 20th centuries. Masterpieces of the French novel and stories from such authors as Balzac, Flaubert, Zola, Proust, Gide, Camus and Duras will serve as focus of the course with some attention to literary essays and popular fiction of the same period and the traditions that informed them. Prerequisite: FREN 350 or FREN 351 or permission of instructor. (Group III)

FREN 372. Public and Private Performances (Oancea)
Major French plays from the literature of the 17th-21st centuries form the focus of this course. Selections are grouped around a theme, allowing us to explore the many intersections of private and public life. Representative topics include the generation gap, relations between the sexes, and ambition. The texts will be explored in socio-historical context, offering students a detailed understanding of the medium’s evolution and significance through the centuries. As the culmination of their scholarly and creative work in this course, students will collaborate in staging a short theatrical performance. Prerequisite: FREN 350 or FREN 351 or permission of instructor. (Group III)

FREN 378. French Culture and Civilization (Oancea)
Aimed at enhancing the students’ understanding of modern France, this course investigates issues of central cultural significance. It offers a comprehensive survey of diverse topics that make up French identity and define the French worldview, drawing on journalism, film, music, and other sources. Our reflection will bear on the dynamics of French society, popular culture, the arts and sciences, historical events and figures, regional identity, and current political and intellectual debates. Prerequisite: FREN 350 or FREN 351 or permission of instructor. (Group III)

FREN 490. Independent Study (Staff)
Guided research on a topic in French. Prerequisite: At least one 300 level course; advance consultation with the supervising faculty member is required before pre-registration. F, S.

FREN 491. Directed Readings (Staff)
A reading program in French. Prerequisite: At least one 300 level course; advance consultation with the supervising faculty member is required before pre-registration. F, S.

FREN 499. Seminar: Special Topics in French (Lewis, Oancea)
Seminar on topics of interest to advanced French students. Prerequisite: One course numbered 360 or above or permission of instructor. May be repeated once. (Group III, Diversity – only when concentration is Francophone literature/culture studies course)

German

GERM 110, GERM 111. Beginning German (Wolber)
An introductory course emphasizing four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Consideration of the cultural and historic background of the areas where the language is spoken, and readings designed to introduce students to German culture and literature. The aim is to prepare students to speak and comprehend with some facility and to read texts of moderate difficulty. Emphasis is on class participation and active use of the language. F, S.

GERM 225. Continuing German (Wolber)
An intermediate course that includes an intensive review of Beginning German. Conversational practice, vocabulary building, practice in writing short compositions. Readings and discussion of selected prose and poetry to prepare the student to read German literature and contemporary magazines and newspapers. Prerequisite: GERM 111 or equivalent. F.

GERM 254. Conversation-Composition (Wolber)
Continuation of GERM 225. The course is designed to enhance the students’ ability to understand German (listening and reading skills) and to express themselves in German (speaking and writing skills). Translation and interpretation skills will also be addressed. The course focuses on advanced German grammar, its practical applications, and the use of idiomatic expressions. Gradually more complex short stories will introduce the students to German literature. Prerequisite: GERM 225 or equivalent. S.

GERM 300.1. Landmark Films of the German Language (Staff)
(Every third year)
This advanced German course investigates the artistic qualities as well as the cultural and historical contexts of some of the noted movies made in Germany from the 1920s to the present. The films may have English subtitles, but course lectures and required papers will be in German. Students will screen several films from the Golden Age of German Cinema (1918-1933), films made during and shortly after WWII, the German Democratic Republic (East Germany), the New German Cinema (1965-1985), and those made in the last decades Prerequisite: GERM 254 or equivalent.

GERM 352. The German-Speaking Countries (Wolber)
(Every third year.)
The course provides a systematic overview of the German-speaking countries, especially Austria, Germany, and Switzerland. Their geography, economy, and politics will be discussed. Additional topics will include education, religion, culture, the media, the environment, and sports. Particular attention will be paid to the role the countries play within the European Union. Students are expected to produce a research project in German. Prerequisite: GERM 254 or equivalent.

GERM 355. Advanced Readings in Nonfiction (Wolber)
Comprehensive review of applied grammar and reading of texts representative of present-day German nonfiction. Each student has the opportunity to read materials in his or her major field of interest, including the arts, humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Especially recommended for students anticipating graduate study and research. Prerequisite: GERM 254 or equivalent.

GERM 356. History of German Civilization (Wolber)
(Every third year)
Survey of German cultural history from the Middle Ages to the present. Prerequisite: GERM 254 or equivalent.

GERM 361. 19th-Century German Literature (Wolber)
The main currents of German literature since Goethe’s death in 1832. Reading and interpretation of prose, drama, and poetry representative of 19th-century German literature. Prerequisite: GERM 254 or equivalent. F. (Group III)

GERM 363. The Age of Goethe (Wolber)
(Every third year)
The main currents of German literature during the Age of Goethe (1749-1832). Reading and interpretation of prose, drama, and poetry of Goethe and some of his contemporaries.
Prerequisite: GERM 254 or equivalent. (Group III)

GERM 365. 20th-Century German Literature (Wolber)
(Every third year.)
The main currents of German literature since 1900. Reading and interpretation of prose, drama, and poetry representative of 20th-century German literature. Prerequisite: GERM 254 or equivalent. (Group III)

GERM 490. Independent Study (Wolber)
Guided research on a topic in German. Advance consultation with the supervising faculty member is required before pre-registration. F, S.

GERM 491. Directed Readings (Wolber)
A reading program in German. Advance consultation with the supervising faculty member is required before pre-registration. F, S.

Italian

ITAL 110, ITAL 111. Beginning Italian (Bertolini-Puckett)
Introductory courses emphasizing four basic skills: aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing with consideration of the cultural and historic background of the areas where the language is spoken. Readings are designed to introduce students to Italian culture. The aim is to prepare students to speak and comprehend with some facility and to read various kinds of texts. Emphasis is on class participation and active use of the language. F, S.

ITAL 225. Continuing Italian (Bertolini-Puckett)
This course reinforces the four basic skills: aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. There will be grammar review, vocabulary building, and a focus on certain structures to strengthen the student’s ability and desire to use the oral and written language. There will be readings of various kinds and video in Italian added to supplement the text. Students will continue to explore Italian culture, present and past, through a variety of media. F.

Japanese

JAPN 110, JAPN 111. Beginning Japanese (Kawabe)
An introductory course focusing on all language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing through a variety of class activities on everyday situations. Particular emphasis will be placed on oral communication. Both hiragana and katakana are learned at the early stage, and the first 125 kanji are introduced and practiced, Students will gain appropriate cultural knowledge as a part of essential language skills. Class participation and daily study is a key to achieve success in this course. F, S.

JAPN 225, JAPN 254. Continuing Japanese I and II (Kawabe)
This sequential course will continue to build skills necessary to the basic communicative Japanese. The goal of the course is to further develop all four language skills: listening (to understand colloquial conversations), speaking (to express oneself in a variety of daily situations), reading (to skim and scan Japanese texts), and writing (to express descriptions and some functional writing skills, such as letter writing). Students will develop these skills through further learning of basic grammatical structures and appropriate sociolinguistic understanding of the Japanese culture. Prerequisite: JAPN 111 or permission of instructor. S.

JAPN 310. Advanced Japanese I (Kawabe)
The course reviews the intermediate level of the Japanese language and builds a higher level of language skills. Class activities focus on oral communication while students develop grammatical fluency and reading competency, recognizing 600 kanji characters and more. Active class discussions and student-led projects are regularly assigned throughout the course. Students will learn to utilize online resources and apply technology skills in projects and presentations. Prerequisite: JAPN 254 or equivalent. F.

Russian

RUSS 110, RUSS 111. Beginning Russian
(Not currently offered)
Introductory courses stressing four basic skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The Cyrillic alphabet, correct pronunciation, and introductory grammar are covered. Through an emphasis on active use of the language, students learn the practical application of Russian in day-to-day situations. Different aspects of Russian culture are also discussed. A variety of media including cassette tapes, videos, CD-ROMs, and the World Wide Web are used in the process of learning the language. F, S.

RUSS 225. Continuing Russian
(Not currently offered)
This continuation of Beginning Russian further develops the four skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. While there is some grammar review, the course expands upon the basics of Russian grammar and broadens the students’ active use of the language. As the students’ use of the language grows, more communicative activities are added. Extra readings from a number of sources supplement the textbook, and different aspects of Russian culture are discussed. A variety of media including cassette tapes, videos, CD-ROMs, and the World Wide Web are used in the process of learning the language. F.

Spanish

SPAN 110, SPAN 111. Beginning Spanish (Staff)
An introductory course emphasizing the four basic skills: aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Consideration of the cultural and historic background of the areas where the language is spoken, and readings designed to introduce students to Spanish and Latin American cultures and literatures. The aim is to prepare students to speak and comprehend with some facility and to read texts of moderate difficulty. Emphasis is on class participation and active use of the language. F, S.

SPAN 225. Continuing Spanish: Intensive Review (Colvin, Counselman, Nieto, Paris-Huesca, Rojas)
An intermediate course with intensive review of pronunciation and the fundamental structures of grammar. Conversational practice, vocabulary building, practice in writing of compositions. Readings and discussions of selected works from Spanish and Latin American literatures. Designed for students who test in at this level or who have satisfied the language requirement but would like to continue to increase their fluency in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 111 or equivalent. F, S.

SPAN 226. Continuing Spanish: Intensive Review II (Colvin, Counselman, Nieto, Paris-Huesca, Rojas)
An intermediate course with intensive review of pronunciation, spelling and the fundamental structures of grammar. The course will cover conversational practice, vocabulary building, and further development in writing of compositions as well as readings and discussions of cultural material. Designed for students who test in at this level or who have satisfied the language requirement but who would like to continue to increase their fluency in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 225 or equivalent. F, S.

SPAN 241. Spanish Language Practicum (0.25 unit; Staff)
A conversation practicum in which cultural and language topics are used as substance for class discussions and projects. Students are required to speak Spanish. Students wanting to satisfy the Modern Foreign Language House requirement should enroll in SPAN 241 for the fall semester and SPAN 242 for spring semester. SPAN 241 may be repeated once for a total of one-half unit, not to be counted toward the major or minor. Prerequisite: SPAN 225 or the equivalent. F.

SPAN 242. Spanish Language Practicum (0.25 unit; Staff)
SPAN 242 may be repeated once for a total of one-half unit, not to be counted toward the major or minor. Prerequisite: SPAN 225 or equivalent. S.

SPAN 250. Composition: Topics in Hispanic Culture (Colvin, Counselman, Nieto, Paris-Huesca, Rojas)
This class features intensive vocabulary building, development of skills in listening, reading, writing and conversation through topics in the cultures and literatures of the Hispanic world. This course stresses preparation of students to express their ideas clearly and concisely in Spanish, primarily in writing as well as in oral conversation. Prerequisite: SPAN 226 or permission of professor. F, S. (Diversity)

SPAN 300.1. Femmes Fatales, Murderers, and Other Outcasts: Spanish Noir and Detective Fiction (Paris-Huesca)
The primary focus of this course is to introduce students to the origins, developments, distinguishing elements, and ideological uses of Spanish noir and detective fiction. The course includes a selection of primary works in literature and cinema from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present, as well as critical articles that analyze these genres from different perspectives (history, sociology, psychology, gender). The authors included are Manuel V. Montalbán, Rosa Montero, Juan Madrid, Patricia Ferreira, and Enrique Urbizu, among others. The main goals of this interdisciplinary course are two. First, to give students a better understanding of the use of this broad genre as a cultural space to discuss, denounce, and advance social and political issues at a national and global level. Second, to provide them with the basic tools to analyze the selected works critically and logically. Particular attention will be given to gender role representation, aesthetics, and leitmotifs. Prerequisite: SPAN 350 or permission of instructor. (Group III)

SPAN 300.7. Sorcerers and Witches in Spanish Literature (Nieto)
This course will focus on the representation of sorcerers and witches in early modern Spanish literature during the 16th and 17th centuries. It will take into account the historical, social and religious context in which they were produced. Some of the questions that will be addressed are: Where do these characters come from? Why are they often portrayed as women? Why are they so appealing to writers and their audiences? What do they represent? Works to be studied include, but are not limited to: La Celestina, by Fernando de Rojas; El Coloquio de los perros, by Miguel de Cervantes; El caballero de Olmedo, by Lope de Vega; Amazonas en las Indias, by Tirso de Molina; El mayor encanto amor, by Calderón de la Barca; La fuerza del amor, by María de Zayas; El Conde Partinuplés, by Ana Caro; and Entremés famoso de las brujas, by Agustín Moreto. These texts will be complemented by secondary sources, including works of art, historical documents, as well as films and other forms of modern media. The course will be taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 350 or permission of instructor. (Group III)

SPAN 300.8. The Construction of Latin American Identities: From the Center to the Margins (Colvin)
Ever since the Latin American Wars of Independence in the early 19th century, much of Latin America’s literary production has been characterized by the ongoing search for a sense of national identity. This course will examine works by both canonical and non-canonical authors in order to study the quest for identity from the perspective of the center (represented by the government or the ruling class) as well as various points of view of those who exist at the margins of the nation(s), thus opening a discussion of national identity that takes into account questions of race and gender, ethnic and linguistic variations, as well as the experience of exile and cultural imperialism. The course will focus on various regions in Latin America (the Southern Cone, the Andean Highlands, and the Caribbean) and include excerpts from essays, short stories, poetry, novels and films. Prerequisite: SPAN 350 or permission of instructor. (Group III, Diversity)

SPAN 350. Introduction to Hispanic Literature (Colvin, Nieto, Paris-Huesca, Rojas)
An introductory course designed to prepare students for advanced literary study. The fundamental objective of this course is to study the development of the literary genres (theatre, poetry, narrative fiction and non-fiction) as they interrelate with the major historical, cultural and political events in Spain and Spanish America. The readings will be complemented by secondary sources, including works of art, films and other forms of modern media. Prerequisites: SPAN 250 or permission of instructor. F, S. (Group III, Diversity)

SPAN 358. Spanish Grammar (Carlos Cabrera)
An intensive review of spoken and written Spanish. This course is designed to facilitate student progress in the literature and history courses in the program and will give special attention to the syntax, vocabulary, and idiomatic expressions of Spanish. It is also designed as a continuation of the orientation period study of the Spanish language. (Salamanca Program)

SPAN 359. The History of Spanish Art (Jesús Jimenez)
A review of Spanish art history, with special attention given to the artistic tradition of Salamanca. This class will also prepare students for field trips to Castilian museums of art, architecture and sculpture. May not be counted toward the major or minor for Spanish. Fulfills Group IV Arts distribution. (Salamanca Program)

SPAN 360. Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries Mexican Literature and Popular Cultures (Rojas)
This course studies the Mexican literature and popular cultures in the 20TH AND 21ST centuries and offers the student a better understanding of the actual and crucial role that Hispanic American literature plays as a subject of study in the learning of Spanish. The course begins with the Mexican Revolution in literature, popular culture, and art, then moves forward to post-revolutionary and avant garde narrative, art, and poetry, and it continues with the student protest during the second half of the 20TH century. The course will end with a study of contemporary writers and the US/Mexico border literature and culture current scene,and willL reveal how their works represents Mexican popular cultures, social movements like Neozapatism and compromised literature at the end of the twentieth and beginning of the 21ST.  This is a digital liberal  arts project oriented course and reqquires team work participation. Prerequisite: SPAN 350 or permission of instructor. (Group III, Diversity)

SPAN 361. Contemporary Spanish Drama: From the 1900s to the Present (Paris-Huesca)
This course examines Spanish drama from the XX and XXI centuries, in relation to the political, cultural, and artistic developments of the social scene of contemporary Spain. The main objective of this course is to provide students with the basic tools to analyze Spanish theatrical literature. The course follows an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the works of Jacinto Benavente, Paloma Pedrero, José Luis Alonso de Santos, Federico García Lorca, Cristina Fernández Cubas, and Diana de Paco, among others. The goal is to help students develop a thorough knowledge of the selected works in relation to their particular socio-political and cultural contexts, to enhance their skills in the Spanish language, and to develop critical and analytical thinking skills. Theoretical exposition will be combined with collective discussion based on active and spontaneous participation, weekly readings and comprehension handouts, and oral presentations. Film and other forms of media, art, and popular culture will be used to complement themes and explore the transformation of a literary text to a staged representation or media production. Prerequisite: SPAN 350 or permission of instructor. (Group III)

SPAN 362. The Poetics of Latin American Literature: Narrative and Poetry (Rojas)
This course examines Latin America’s poetics through its literature of the 20TH and 21ST centuries. Special attention will be paid to both narrative (short story) and poetry genres, as well as to mythic, artistic, historical and social-political aspects of Latin America. The extensive use of cultural materials including art, films, pictures and music will aid in the comprehension and analysis of the readings. This is a digital liberal arts project oriented course and requires team work participation. Prerequisite: SPAN 350 or permission of instructor. (Group III, Diversity)

SPAN 364. The Latin American Novel Within Its Revolutions, Cultures and Social Changes (Rojas)
In this class, we’ll study the main narrative works of HISPANIC America from the end of the 19TH century to the establishment of the “post-boom” at the end of the 20TH century, and well into the 21st century.  We will cover the main literary movements such as indigenismo, criollismo, regionalismo, vanguardia y pos-vanguardiA WHILE We read novels from authors such as Mariano Azuela, Carlos Fuentes, Julio Cortázar, Gabriel García Márquez, and Isabel Allende, among others. The extensive use of cultural materials including art, films, pictures and music will aid in the comprehension of the readings. This is a digital liberal arts project oriented course and requires team work participation. Prerequisite: SPAN 350 or permission of instructor. (Group III, Diversity)

SPAN 365. Cervantes and the Quijote (Nieto)
This course will study the major episodes of the Don Quixote de La Mancha, one of the most influential works of Spanish and World literature, as well as other selected works written by Cervantes. Emphasis will be given to the author’s unique contribution to the birth of the modern novel and his ingenuity to create stories that transformed all previous literary genres. These readings will be analyzed within its socio-historical context, while exploring a diverse array of topics, such as: love, religion, race, class, magic, madness, and honor, among others. The readings will be complemented by secondary sources, including works of art, films and other forms of modern media. The course will be taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 350 or permission of instructor. (Group III)

SPAN 367. Spanish Literature and Culture from the 1800s to the Present (Paris-Huesca)
This course examines Spanish literature and culture from 1800s to the present. The course will focus on short story, poetry, drama, essay, novel, and cinema in relation to the major literary movements and periods in Spain (romanticism, pre-modernism, realism, naturalism, vanguardias, civil war, postwar, democracy, and new millennium). Among the authors included are Emilia P. Bazán, Gustavo A. Bécquer, Benito P. Galdós, Vicente Huidobro, Pedro Almodóvar, Federico G. Lorca, Antonio and Manuel Machado, Carmen M. Gaite, and Luis Buñuel. The goal is to help students develop an extensive knowledge of the selected works within a broader socio-political and cultural national and global context, to enhance their skills in the Spanish language, and to develop a critical and analytical thought. Theoretical exposition will be combined with collective discussion based on active and spontaneous participation, weekly readings and comprehension handouts, and oral presentations. The course follows an interdisciplinary approach to the study of literature, with additional emphasis on cinema. A selection of documentaries, paintings, journal articles, artistic adaptations, and other forms of popular culture will be used along with the main texts to familiarize students with the cultural developments of the Spanish literary and visual art scene. Prerequisite: SPAN 350 or permission of instructor. (Group III)

SPAN 368. Special Topics in Hispanic Cinema and Literature (Colvin, Counselman, Nieto, Paris-Huesca, Rojas)
Course designed for students who want to improve their conversational abilities in Spanish while acquiring the basic tools to analyze filmic texts. A variety of films and literary selections from Latin America and Spain will be the basis for classroom activities that relate to particular aspects of the Hispanic world. Students will work collaboratively in a variety of settings (dialogues, interviews, film reviews, group discussions, and oral presentations). This class will be conducted in Spanish. Co-requisite: In order to be eligible to enroll in this course, the student must simultaneously be enrolled in SPAN 250 or SPAN 350 with permission of instructor. Not open to students with prior credit for SPAN 250 or SPAN 350. (Group III, Diversity)

SPAN 369. Early Modern Spanish Literature and Culture (Nieto)
This course will study Early Modern Spanish literature and culture. Focus will be given to the analysis of the comedia, an innovative type of drama that gave birth to a lively and eminent theatrical tradition. Some topics to be considered are: cross-dressing, the role of women as directors, spectators, actresses, and fictional characters, as well as censorship and propaganda. Other literary genres cultivated during this period, such as the novel, will be reviewed in order to examine the socio-political issues affecting Spanish society during the 16th and 17th centuries and to analyze how they have been adapted for present-day audiences. Writers include but are not limited to: Miguel de Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, María de Zayas, Ana Caro, Calderón de la Barca, and Agustín Moreto, among others. Course readings will be supplemented with secondary sources, including works of art, contemporary productions of plays, films, and other forms of modern media. The course will be taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 350 or permission of instructor. (Group III)

SPAN 370. The Child in Contemporary Latin American Literature and Film (Colvin)
This course examines the use of child characters/narrators in contemporary Latin American narrative and film in order to explore questions related to the role of the child’s voice within the text and the view of childhood in Latin America’s cultural production. It will feature films, short stories, and novels by well-known authors from various regions within Latin America (including Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Uruguay, and Puerto Rico). Both the texts and the films will be studied within the historical, social, and political context in which they were produced. Prerequisite: SPAN 350 or permission of instructor. (Group III, Diversity)

SPAN 374. Topics in Latin-American Narrative (María Ángeles Pérez López)
Intensive review of the Latin-American narrative, the course will follow a selection of works of the most renowned writers of the twentieth century. Compositions and class conversations are based on selected topics such as magical realism, neo-fantasy, irony, de-mystification, and genre, among others. Authors include Horacio Quirogo, Alfredo Byrce Echenique, Isabel Allende, Rosario Ferré, Julio Cortázar, Gabriel Garcia Márquez, Luisa Valenzuela, and Ana Maria Shua. (Group III, Diversity, Salamanca Program)

SPAN 375. The Golden Age in Literature and Culture (Staff)
An interdisciplinary study of the literature of the Spanish Golden Age (1492-1681). Special attention will be given to the masterworks and great authors associated with Salamanca, including the Lazarillo de Tormes, la Celestina, San Juan de la Cruz, Fray Luis de León and Calderón de la Barca. The aim is to provide students with an exposure to the great works and literary figures of Spain during the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Presentation of literature will be made in the context of the art, architecture, and music of the period. (Group III, Salamanca Program)

SPAN 377. Contemporary Spanish Literature (María Isabel Toro Pascua)
A study of Spanish literature from the Generation of 1898 to the present with special emphasis given to prose works. Readings will include the works of Unamuno, Azorín, Cela, and other writers who reflect the contemporary Spanish sensibility. A course designed to complement the course in contemporary Spanish offered in the program by our resident director. (Group III, Salamanca Program)

SPAN 378. Contemporary Spanish History (Francisco J. Rodriguez Jiménez)
The major themes and problems of twentieth century Spanish history will be presented in the context of Spanish traditions. May not be counted toward the Spanish major or minor but may be counted in the Department of History as a European history course. Also listed as HIST 366. (Group I, Salamanca Program)

SPAN 381. Advanced Spanish Grammar (Counselman)
An advanced analytical approach to Spanish grammar through linguistics. In this course students receive an introduction to the areas of linguistics known as syntax (the structure of phrases and sentences), morphology (the structure of words) and semantics (the meaning of words, phrases, and sentences). The course concentrates on the morphosyntactic errors most frequently made by learners of Spanish. This is not a review of basic Spanish grammar, but rather students learn terms and concepts related to sentence structure, verbs and verbal complements, tense, mood, aspect, and noun phrases, among others. Students use their knowledge of these terms and concepts as a tool to gain a more profound understanding of Spanish grammar and morphosyntactic differences in English and Spanish. Variations in grammatical structures are discussed, especially when typical native speaker usage deviates from introductory textbooks. Students are expected to read, study, and complete exercises outside of class and be prepared to participate and discuss exercises in class. Students are evaluated based on their class participation and their performance on exams, quizzes, homework exercises, and final projects. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 350 or permission of instructor.

SPAN 382. Spanish Linguistics (Counselman)
This course provides an introduction to linguistics (with a focus on Spanish and taught in Spanish) and covers the linguistic history of the Spanish language as well as some of its current dialectal variations. Students gain a better understanding of the linguistic evolutions of Latin into Spanish from the Roman invasion of the Iberian Peninsula to the current varieties of Spanish spoken today. They also learn about sociolinguistic research and write a sociolinguistic research proposal as a final paper. Students are expected to read and prepare for class discussion outside of class and are evaluated based on their class participation and performance on exams, quizzes, homework assignments, and final paper. Prerequisites: SPAN 350 or permission of the instructor.

SPAN 383. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology (Counselman)
This upper level Spanish course, taught in Spanish, will focus on the phonetics and phonology of the Spanish language. Topics covered will include articulatory phonetics, Spanish phonology, the difference in phonetics and phonology, the differences in English and Spanish speech sounds, the phonetic and phonological variations that exist in the Spanish-speaking world, and the perception of speech sounds, particularly regarding the perception of a foreign accent. Students will also become familiar with Praat, an acoustic analysis software, learn to record themselves or others, and analyze the sound spectrograms of that recorded speech. Prerequisites: SPAN 350 or permission of instructor. F.

SPAN 490. Independent Study (Staff)
Guided research, with tangible results, on a topic in Spanish. Advance consultation with the supervising faculty member is required before pre-registration. Proposals must be reviewed and approved by the chairperson of the department before the beginning of the project. F, S.

SPAN 491. Directed Readings (Staff)
A reading program in Spanish. Advance consultation with the supervising faculty member is required before pre-registration. Proposals must be reviewed and approved by the chairperson of the department before the beginning of the project. F, S.

SPAN 499. Seminar Special Topics in Spanish (Staff)
Seminar on a topic within Latin American literature for advanced Spanish students. Prerequisite: SPAN 350 and one additional 300 level course in Spanish, or permission of instructor. (Group III, Diversity – only when Latin American literature/culture studies course)