Psychology

PSYC 110. Introduction to Psychology (Staff)
Survey of the different approaches within psychology that seek to describe, predict, and explain both human and animal behavior. Specific areas covered include history and research methodologies, development, the brain and nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, personality, stress and coping, behavior disorders and their treatment, and social behavior. Tier 1 course. F, S. (Group I)

PSYC 210. Quantitative Methods (Brandt, Hall)
The evaluation and interpretation of quantitative data in the behavioral sciences. Descriptive, correlational, and inferential techniques are discussed. Laboratory exercises employing statistical software are used to demonstrate applications of course material. Students may not receive credit for this course and MATH 105, MATH 200.3, or MATH 230. Prerequisite: C- or better in PSYC 110 and one additional PSYC course. F, S. (Quantitative)

PSYC 252. Social Psychology (Smith)
An introduction to the scientific study of how individuals think, feel, and behave when in the presence of other people, as well as how individuals’ thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are affected by others. Topics include the self-concept, social perception, stereotyping and prejudice, persuasion, conformity, group behavior, close relationships, altruism, and aggression. Prerequisite: C- or better in PSYC 110. Tier 2 course. F, S. (Group I)

PSYC 255. Clinical Neuroscience (Yates)
The emphasis of this course is a relatively new area known as Clinical Neuroscience, which is simply an exploration of the neurobiological foundations of mental health and mental illness. Important themes emphasized in this course include 1) the consideration of only empirically based evidence, 2) the view that mental illness represents a disruption of neurobiological homeostasis, 3) the acknowledgement that because the brain is a plastic organ, the clinical relevance of environmental and behavioral influences is difficult to overestimate, and 4) the recognition of the value of ecologically relevant animal models in the investigation of various aspects of mental illness. Normally, students would not take this course and PSYC 343. Prerequisite: C- or better in PSYC 110. Tier 2 course. S. (Group I)

PSYC 258. Psychology and the Law (Smith)
This course examines the relationship between psychology and the legal system. Broadly, the course will look at ways that psychologists participate in the legal system (e.g., as trial consultants, by performing competency evaluations), ways in which psychological processes may affect legal outcomes (e.g., causing errors in eyewitness memory, aiding or impairing lie detection) and aspects of the legal system into which psychologists can have insight (e.g., jury decision making, interview techniques to minimize errors, the insanity defense). Prerequisite: C- or better in PSYC 110. Tier 2 course. S. (Group I)

PSYC 259. Personality Psychology (Henderson)
This course is an introduction to the study and science of personality psychology—consistencies in qualities, thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that characterize a person’s individuality. We will explore the diversity of modern theories of human personality, the empirical research they consider, and the procedures they use for systematically gaining information about the personality of individuals. Course topics include: personality development; biological and situational influences on personality; traits and motives; identity and the self; and personality through the lens of gender and culture. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110. Tier 2 course. S. (Group I)

PSYC 262. Health Psychology (DiLillo)
The study of the role that psychological and behavioral factors play in physical illness, and in the maintenance and restoration of health. Among topics covered are: the bio-psycho-social model of health and illness, stress, personality and disease, pain, health promotion, and the possible contribution of psychological factors to several major physical disorders. The role of individual behavior in maintaining health and producing illness, as well as behavior-based treatment of physical disorders are also addressed. Prerequisite: C- or better in PSYC 110. Tier 2 course. F. (Group I)

PSYC 264. Organizational Psychology (Henderson)
A broad introductory survey of psychological science on social behavior in organizations, with a focus on the application of psychological theory and research to human management. We will examine how individuals can become more effective members of organizations and create better organizations. Course topics and overarching questions include: how to rally other people to support our goals; how to design effective work teams; how to communicate our ideas effectively; how to avoid common pitfalls when working in a different culture; who has power in organizations and how to get it; and how to become an effective leader in organizations. Students will learn to analyze common organizational problems that people encounter in their everyday work and social lives. Also listed as BUS 264. Prerequisite: C- or better in PSYC 110. Tier 2 course. S. (Group I)

PSYC 282. Adolescent Psychology (Bunnell)
The psychological and physical development of adolescent males and females. Topics include pubertal change, cognitive development, peer influence, adolescent sexual activity, delinquency, substance abuse, and adjustment problems. Prerequisite: C- or better in PSYC 110. Tier 2 course. F, S. (Group I)

PSYC 288. Maturity and Age (Hall)
(Not offered 2016-2017)
The psychological and physiological aspects of the mature and aged individual with emphasis on the intellectual, emotional, social, economic, political, and medical concerns experienced in these periods of life. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110. Tier 2 course. F. (Group I)

PSYC 300.12. Applied Atypical Child Development (Bunnell)
This course introduced students to the developmental trajectories, abilities, and challenges of children with a range of atypical developmental patterns (e.g., learning disabilities, communication disorders, intellectual disabilities, giftedness), with a focus on the policy decisions, controversies, and scientific and pseudoscientific evidence and claims that relate to the care, education, and wellbeing of children with atypical development. This course is particularly relevant for individuals considering a future in which they will be educating, parenting, or providing for a child with special needs, or individuals who are interested in a broad and applied focus on childhood atypical development. Prerequisite: C- or better in PSYC 110. Tier 2 course. F. (Group I)

PSYC 300.13. Behavioral Decision Making (Brandt)
Adult life comes with the responsibility of managing difficult decisions about relationships, health, money, and work, and the classic rational-agent view of human behavior assumes that people are predisposed to view life decisions objectively and to make sound choices regardless of other circumstances. Instead, researchers have discovered that each of us sees the world through a subjective lens that is influenced by our personal experiences, evolutionary history, and immediate surroundings, none of which consistently promotes rational choice. In this course, we will examine the associative, emotional, and motivational processes that govern how people evaluate their environment and make real-life choices in the face of uncertainty and incomplete information. We will also explore how the psychological work on these topics has enhanced our ability to predict and control peoples’ choices and has influenced contemporary decision theory. Learning about these concepts will encourage you to be skeptical about your own judgments, to look out for the many pitfalls of sound decision-making, and to weigh the perspectives of others when judging their choices. Prerequisite: C- or better in PSYC 110. Tier 2 course. S. (Group I)

PSYC 300.14. Psychology of Women and Gender (Henderson)
The psychological science of women, men, and gender. Course topics include: gender stereotypes, gender socialization, love relationships, sexuality, pregnancy and parenthood, women and work, and violence against women. The course will focus on the lived experiences of women, and themes will include the social construction of gender, the gendered nature of social institutions, and the way that gender intersects with race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, social class, and other social categories. Throughout, we will learn how all of these issues relate to women’s mental health and well-being. We will also take a developmental perspective on these issues to understand how they unfold across the lifespan. By the end of the course, students should have a good understanding of what it means to be female in North America. Prerequisite: C- or better in PSYC 110 and two Tier 2 courses. Tier 3 course. S. (Group I)

PSYC 300.15. Cognitive Neuroscience (Bailey)
This course explores the cognitive and neural processes that support perception, attention, memory, social cognition, language, executive function, and decision making. It will explore the evolution and development of the neural structures that underlie these cognitive processes. Students will gain experience with cognitive neuroscience experimental techniques including behavioral and electrophysiological methods of research. Prerequisite: C- or better in PSYC 110 and two Tier 2 psychology courses; or NEUR 300.1; or permission of instructor. Tier 3 course. S. (Group I)

PSYC 300.16. Affective Neuroscience (Bailey)
This course explores the neural processes that give rise to affect and emotion. Emphasis will be on mapping affective experience and behavior to brain function. Both human and animal literatures will be surveyed, and relevant areas covered will include basic theories of emotion, neural circuitry of emotion, fear learning and memory, emotion regulation, and reward. Prerequisite: C- or better in PSYC 110 and two Tier 2 psychology courses; or NEUR 300.1; or permission of instructor. Tier 3 course. F. (Group I)

PSYC 310. Research Methods (1.25 units; Brandt, Hall, Smith)
Introduction to the fundamental methods of empirical research in psychology. Students will collect and analyze data and write research reports for projects employing both experimental and survey designs. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110; C- or better in either PSYC 210, MATH 105, MATH 200.3, MATH 230, or MATH 360 and one additional psychology course. R course. F, S.

PSYC 322. Abnormal Behavior (Staff)
The major forms of abnormal behavior are described. They are discussed in light of an integrative bio-psycho-social model. Disorders include: anxiety disorders, personality disorders, sexual deviance and dysfunction, dissociative and somatoform disorders, mood disorders, eating disorder, childhood disorders, substance use disorders, schizophrenia, and cognitive disorders. Treatment approaches are discussed as well. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110 and two Tier 2 courses. Tier 3 course. S. (Group I)

PSYC 323. Community Psychology (Staff)
(Not offered 2016-2017)
Community psychology has been defined as “the study of the effects of social and environmental factors on behavior as it occurs at individual, group, and societal levels.” This course examines such topics as the ecology of social problems, stress, social support and coping, crisis intervention and mental health consultation, universal, selective, and indicated prevention, program evaluation, and citizen participation in community affairs. Students complete a project in which they research the scope and nature of a social problem both nationally and locally, investigate its effective prevention nationally, and the potential for prevention locally. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110 and two Tier 2 courses. Tier 3 course. F. (Group I)

PSYC 326. Public Health: Psychological, Behavioral, and Social Issues (DiLillo)
(Not offered 2016-2017)
This course is designed to introduce students to the basic tenets, applications, and research methods in public health, with a focus on relevant psychological, behavioral, and social issues in the field. The course will provide a historical perspective on the contributions and role of public health, and will survey the relevant core disciplines such as epidemiology, health behavior and promotion, maternal and child health, and health care systems. Discussion of current events, issues, and emerging challenges in the field will be incorporated throughout the course. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110 and two Tier 2 courses or permission of instructor. Tier 3 course. S. (Group I)

PSYC 327. Counseling and Psychotherapy (DiLillo)
The course presents a broad overview of the theories and practices of counseling and psychotherapy. The major contemporary systems are surveyed. Presented are the basic concepts of each and discussed are features such as the therapeutic process, the client/counselor relationship, and the specific procedures and techniques employed. Also addressed are ethical and professional issues. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110 and two Tier 2 courses. Tier 3 course. F. (Group I)

PSYC 333. Child Psychology (Bunnell)
The psychological and physiological development of the child from conception to adolescence. This course examines the effects of parents, school, and community practices on emotion, social, and intellectual aspects of child behavior. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110 and two Tier 2 courses. Tier 3 course. S. (Group I)

PSYC 336. Clinical Child Psychology (Bunnell)
(Not offered 2016-2017)
This course discusses the development of children with both physical and emotional difficulties, with a focus on the etiology of childhood disorders, as well as the efficacy of treatment and intervention. This course is designed for individuals interested in pursuing research and/or practice in a clinical child field or those who would like to gain a stronger background in the clinical child psychological literature. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110 and two Tier 2 courses. Tier 3 course. (Group I)

PSYC 343. Behavioral Neuroscience (Yates)
Introduction to the biological mechanisms and neural processes underlying behavior, sensory functions, and internal regulation. No previous biological background necessary. The emphasis is on the relationship of neurophysiology to such basic processes as arousal, attention, motivation, learning, memory, abnormal behavior, and perception. An optional laboratory (PSYC 344) is available. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110 and two Tier 2 psychology courses; or NEUR 300.1; or permission of instructor. Tier 3 course. F. (Group I)

PSYC 344. Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience (0.25 unit; Yates)
Laboratory exercises focusing on the anatomical organization of the brain and a novel experiment using systemic interventions, behavioral measures and/or histological techniques, and data analysis. This optional laboratory must be taken concurrently with PSYC 343 or after. F. (Group I)

PSYC 345. Psychopharmacology (Yates)
This course will involve consideration of the relationships among drugs, the nervous system, conscious experience, and behavior. The history, as well as the psychopharmacology, of a wide variety of licit and illicit substances is surveyed including alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, cocaine, amphetamines, marijuana, psychedelics, opiates, and prescription drugs. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110 and two Tier 2 psychology courses; or NEUR 300.1; or permission of instructor. Tier 3 course. S. (Group I)

PSYC 346. Sensation and Perception (Staff)
(Not offered 2016-2017)
Processes by which organisms acquire and organize sensory and perceptual information. Underlying neural mechanisms and traditional psychophysical relationships are reviewed for the visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, pain, and taste systems. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110, two Tier 2 courses, and PSYC 255, PSYC 343, or permission of instructor. Tier 3 course. S. (Group I)

PSYC 363. Learning (Brandt)
Methods and issues involved in the development of theories of learning. Although focusing primarily on basic learning mechanisms investigated through animal research, the course includes discussion of the application of these theories to human life and society. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110 and two Tier 2 courses. Tier 3 course. F. (Group I)

PSYC 364. Cognitive Psychology (Hall)
An introduction to the basic concepts and theories of human cognition. Topics include attention, memory, knowledge organization, language, reasoning, and problem solving. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110 and two Tier 2 courses. Tier 3 course. F. (Group I)

PSYC 366. Behavior Modification (DiLillo)
Behavior modification is a comprehensive technology for the improvement of behavior based on scientifically derived and empirically demonstrated principles of learning. Behavior modification has been applied to a wide variety of populations and many different types of issues. This course is designed to give students fundamental knowledge concerning the philosophy, history, principles, and procedures used in behavior modification. Additionally, students will formulate, design, conduct, write, and present a self-modification project using an empirically based intervention. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110 and two Tier 2 courses. Tier 3 course. S. (Group I)

PSYC 374. Topics in Neuroscience (Yates)
(Not offered 2016-2017)
In-depth examination of a current topic in the field of neuroscience. The course will use primary sources and discussion to examine, in depth, a current neuroscientific focus. Previous topics have included Neural and Psychiatric Disorders, Spinal Cord Injury, and Neurolaw. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110 and two Tier 2 psychology courses; or NEUR 300.1; or permission of instructor. Tier 3 course. R course. S. (Group I)

PSYC 410. Advanced Research Methods (Staff)
(Not offered 2016-2017)
Individual empirical research that builds upon the fundamentals covered in PSYC 310. Prerequisite: PSYC 310 and permission of instructor.

PSYC 420. Advanced Quantitative Methods (Hall)
(Not offered 2016-2017)
The analysis and interpretation of behavioral data gathered from both experimental and correlational designs. Particular emphasis is given to analysis of variance and multiple regression and correlation methods. Statistical software is used to analyze illustrative data. Prerequisite: PSYC 210, MATH 105, MATH 200.3, or MATH 230, or permission of instructor.

PSYC 452. Social Cognition (Smith)
(Not offered 2016-2017)
An advanced seminar examining the processes and mechanisms that underlie our thinking about ourselves and others. Topics to be covered include the consequences of automatic social processes, the causes and nature of stereotyping, how and why our judgments about ourselves and others go awry, the effects that our expectations and desires have on information processing and how feedback from the body can influence social cognitive processes. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110, two Tier 2 courses, and either PSYC 252, PSYC 364, or permission of instructor. Tier 3 course. S. (Group I)

PSYC 490. Independent Study (Staff)
Individually supervised empirical projects in psychology. It is normally expected that the student have a B average in psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 210, PSYC 310, and permission of instructor. F, S.

PSYC 491. Directed Readings (Staff)
Individually supervised surveys of the literature on a topic in psychology. Prerequisite: C- or better in PSYC 110 and permission of instructor. F, S. (Group I)

PSYC 495. Apprenticeship (Staff)
Junior or senior majors under faculty supervision locate jobs in areas in which they are qualified. Between 120 and 150 hours of service per semester earns 1.00 unit of credit. Agency and faculty supervisors provide frequent feedback. Journal and final report tying the work experience to academic experience are required. Graded as satisfactory/ unsatisfactory. Only one unit may be counted toward psychology major. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and PSYC 322 for clinical/ counseling apprenticeship. F, S.

PSYC 499. Seminar (Bunnell)
A psychology topic of contemporary concern presented in a seminar format. Prerequisites: C- or better in PSYC 110, two Tier 2 courses, and junior or senior standing or permission of instructor. May not be taken more than twice. Tier 3 course. S. (Group I)