Note: There is no Film Studies Department. Most courses have long been included in the Film Studies minor.

ART 111. Survey of Art History II
Introduction to the visual language of art and the major periods of art history from the Renaissance through contemporary art. Provides historical context for the invention and development of film as an art form of the late 19th through the early 21st centuries.

ART 112. Two Dimensional Design
A study of the elements of art and the application of the principles of organization as they relate to both decorative and illusionary space. Through exercises and projects students become familiar with the elements of line, shape, value, texture, and color. Also, students are required to develop a vocabulary of art terms and present their work for class critiques. Introduces students to aesthetic principles of composition in two dimensions, including those related to creating the illusion of three dimensions.

ART 345 Modern Art
Impressionism to the present, with an emphasis on major developments in 20th Century painting and sculpture. Prerequisite: ART 111 or consent of instructor. Provides aesthetic and historical context for the emergence of motion pictures.

ART 347 Contemporary Art
The art and critical theory of the second half of the twentieth century. Beginning with late modernist abstract expressionism, this course examines the development of postmodern visual art forms to the present day. Prerequisite: ART 111 or consent of instructor. Provides aesthetic and historical context for film as a contemporary art form.

ART 353. Computer Imaging I
Introduction to computer-generated art with emphasis on creating color images for output on color paint jet printers and photo mechanical processes either to printmaking or photographic systems. Specific focus will be made to hand generation using color paint software, video digitizing, and color image processing. Prerequisite: ART 112 or consent of instructor. Introduces students to the field of Computer-Generated Imaging (CGI), an important part of filmmaking today.

ART 355. Photography I
Emphasis is on developing a thorough understanding of the 35mm camera, its operations, and its application as a tool for self-expression. The basics of lighting, exposure, film processing, contact and projection printing, and image presentation are covered. Slide presentations and weekly critiques coincide with hands-on experience. Students must have continuous access to a 35mm camera with adjustable controls. Prerequisite: ART 112 or consent of instructor. Introduces students to principles of photography fundamental to an understanding of cinematography.

CMLT 100 1. Space and Place in Literature and Film
How does the representation of space and place in literature contribute to our understanding of the social and cultural dynamics of our contemporary world? In the context of current events, space is so often understood in terms of borders, nations, security zones, and territory. Where do spaces of human existence and experience—home, garden, bus, alley, café—fit into the equation? This course will examine fictional and autobiographical works that foreground a poetics of space. Looking at works from the Middle East, Europe, and the United States, we will explore the ways in which authors and filmmakers reference space to reflect on their place in the world around them. In doing so, we will address the following questions: How might we conceptualize spaces of possibility and connection? What types of alternative geographies emerge when emotional attachments and memory are considered in the framework of spatial orientation? All readings will be in the original English or English translation. Explores a cultural context of film; non-American.

CMLT 200.6. Cairo Cosmopolitan
In the globalized Middle East of the twenty-first century, Cairo occupies a unique position as both a relic of a bygone era and a hotbed of political, cultural, and artistic activities that point to emergent contemporary forms of cosmopolitanism. This course offers a look at literary and cinematic representations of Cairo as both an iconic urban center steeped in nostalgia and a wellspring of what Diane Singerman and Paul Amar, in Cairo Cosmopolitan: Politics, Culture, and Urban Space in the New Globalized Middle East, have termed “vernacular, bottom-up cosmopolitanisms” or grass-roots visions of what a cosmopolitan city should embody. The literary works and films discussed in this course will range from wistful depictions of Cairo as Umm al-dunya (mother of the Earth) in the glory days of her Golden Age, to contemporary reflections on the city as a central player in the political, cultural, and demographic dynamics of the Middle East. The course will feature units on nostalgia, belle époque Cairo, the Egyptian Jewish diaspora, Cairo in the Israeli literary imagination, gender and cosmopolitics, and cosmopolitanism in the wake of the Arab Spring. Explores a cultural context of film; non-American.

CMLT 300.3. Cinemas of the Middle East
This course examines Middle Eastern cinema from the early twentieth century to the present day. As a comparative literature course with a focus on the textual medium of film, “Cinemas of the Middle East” takes up questions of representation, translation, cultural identity, multilingualism, cosmopolitanism, trauma, and dissidence. The course is structured around several historical moments that reshaped the geopolitical and cultural landscape of the Middle East. We will start with a unit on Egyptian film and examine the notion of Egypt as the “Hollywood of the Middle East.” We will then move through a unit on the 1948 Arab-Israeli War and look at the ways in which 1948 is portrayed alternately as the birth of the Israeli nation and the catastrophic start of the Palestinian refugee crisis. Subsequent units examine cinematic treatments of the 1967 Arab-Israeli War and its aftermaths, the decline of cosmopolitanism, Mizrahi cinema and identity politics in Israel, the Lebanese civil war and trauma narratives, the 1979 Iranian Revolution and responses to censorship, transnational productions, and new filmic techniques that reflect the aesthetics and modes of communication of the digital age. Covers cultural context and film theory and develops analytical skills; non-American film.

CMLT 321. East Asian Film
Some scholars argue that film is the new literary form of the late 20th and early 21st century. This course will focus on films that are products of one of the most populous and economically powerful parts of the world—East Asia. We will look at East Asian films (China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan) to see in what ways they are unique expressions of Asian culture and thinking and in what ways they are part of a more global world of filmmaking. We will study film theory and learn how to critically watch a film. We will also read theoretical works that specifically address the art of Asian films. While reading these theoretical works, we will look at famous Asian films that have made an historic impact in the film world. Finally, we will look at current trends in Asian films, with particular emphasis on the way Asian films have influenced Hollywood. Specific genres we will study include: Japanese anime, J-Horror, and Chinese martial arts films. Covers cultural context, film theory, and genre and develops analytical skills; non-American film.

ENG 150. Introduction to Literary Study
A course to help students appreciate and understand the conventions of fiction, poetry, drama, and the essay. It raises fundamental questions about the nature of literature. Although works and approaches vary with the instructor, the emphasis of this course remains the same: it focuses on close reading and analysis to develop students’ critical skills and to enrich their emotional and intellectual experience of literary texts. While this course may or may not include film, depending on the instructor, it does introduce conventions of narrative that apply to narrative film, as well as concepts of genre.

ENG 224. African American Images
This course examines both literature and film, focusing on the representation of African Americans, and the artistic and sociocultural functions of those representations. Possible topics include: “Images of Black Women in Fiction and Film,” “Figures in Black,” “Black Women Film Makers.” Includes cultural context and, depending on the topic, film and aesthetic theory; minority American film.

ENG 226. American Images
A survey of selected poets, novelists, and essayists from the breadth of traditions and  counter-traditions in American literature. Works will be read to reveal how “America” has been imagined and to shed light on the question of what it means to be an “American.” Some topics include film, such as “The Western,” which covers cultural context and genre, and “Jazz Age Literature and Film,” which covers cultural context; both develop analytical skills.

ENG 254. Introduction to Film
A critical and historical approach to film. The course provides an overview of the development of filmmaking and a survey of representative film genres, directors, and international film movements. Introductory course for the major; addresses all learning objectives except experience with filmmaking (although it may include some basic screenwriting).

ENG 268. Black Women’s Literary Traditions
Examines a variety of texts by Black women writers such as Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, Toni Morrison, Ntozake Shange, Alice Walker, and Jamaica Kincaid. Explores the ways in which Black feminist critical methodologies have been important to the recovery and interpretation of Black women’s texts. Variable content course whose topics may include “Black Feminist Readings of Visual Texts,” which examines a cultural and theoretical context for film and develops analytical skills; minority American and/or non-American film.

ENG 318/THEA 369. Playwriting
In this workshop in script development the student is guided by readings of plays and a drama handbook, written exercises, and revisions to complete a one-act play. Prerequisite: ENG 105 and one college theatre or college creative writing course. For those students wishing additional exposure to and practice in script writing, this course is relevant to skills in filmmaking.

ENG 319. Screenwriting
Designed to introduce the student to screenplay form and technique, this workshop moves from readings through written exercises to a completed dramatic script of about thirty minutes in length. Offers development of skills in filmmaking.

ENG 369. Genre Studies in African American Literature
Variable course focusing on a specific genre—narrative, poetry, novel, drama, essay—within African American literary tradition. The course will examine both literary and sociopolitical factors that have influenced the development of the specific genre. Course content will vary. May include film and cover cultural and aesthetic context as well as developing analytical skills; minority American film.

ENG 480. Advanced Creative Writing Workshop
The capstone creative writing course, this workshop is for students who have successfully completed two of the four genre workshops: Writing Fiction (ENG 314), Writing Poetry (ENG 316), Playwriting (ENG 318), or Screenwriting (ENG 319) and wish to do advanced work in their chosen genre. Offers the opportunity for advanced work relevant to skills in filmmaking.

ENG 495. Apprenticeships
Individually arranged apprenticeships both on and off campus. Students must apply in advance of the apprenticeship.

  • Film
    The student must apply to the Film Studies Director with the support of a faculty supervisor. Opportunities typically involve meaningful work with a film production company.

FREN 300.1. French Language Film: Le Cinéma de Langue Française
This course features French films selected from earliest cinematic history to the present time from France and other French-speaking regions of the world. Students will explore the interplay of image, story and sound track in representative film genres and directors. The course also focuses on movements of social identity and critical interpretations that continue to shape both films of fiction and documentary. This course is taught in the target language. Prerequisites: FREN 350 or FREN 351 or permission of instructor. Covers cultural context and film theory and develops analytical skills; non-American film.

FREN 300.4. Contemporary Franco-Arab Cultural Exchanges: Exploring the Literature and Film of French Expression From the Maghreb and Mashreq
In this seminar, we will study the relationships between France and the Arab world in the twentieth century through the analysis of literary and critical texts as well as through the study of film. Through close readings of francophone texts and films from Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Lebanon, and Syria, students will engage with such questions as how to think and understand the role of the French language outside of France; the ways colonization and decolonization shape (or do not shape) these texts; how to understand postcolonial identity; and the manner in which an author’s (or auteur’s) politics, narrative, and aesthetics interact with one another. Throughout this course, students will hone their critical thinking, argumentation, textual analysis, and writing skills and will continue to progress in their fluency in French. This course is taught in the target language. Prerequisite: FREN 350 or FREN 351. Covers cultural context and film theory; non-American film.

GERM 300.1. Landmark Films of the German Language
This advanced German course investigates the artistic qualities as well as the cultural and historical contexts of some of the noted movies made in Germany from the 1920s to the present. The films may have English subtitles, but course lectures and required papers will be in German. Students will screen several films from the Golden Age of German Cinema (1918-1933), films made during and shortly after WWII, the German Democratic Republic (East Germany), the New German Cinema (1965-1985), and those made in the last decades . This course is taught in the target language. Prerequisite: GERM 254 or equivalent. Covers cultural context and film theory and develops analytical skills; non-American film.

JOUR 252. Video Production (New Course)

JO 300.2 / WGS 300.2. Women and Media
This course examines representations of women in the media and concepts of female identity with an emphasis on research methodology. Feminist media theory will be used to analyze and critique print and broadcast news media, advertising, depictions of female sexuality, television and film. Analysis will consider the impact of issues such as race, class and sexual orientation; identify and evaluate stereotypes of women; and engage students to think critically about the impact of popular culture on personal and societal values. It will also explore the role of women as media consumers and the importance of women media-makers. Also listed as JOUR 300.2. Covers cultural context and develops analytical skills.

MUS 105. Appreciation of Music Literature
The great composers and some of their masterpieces, assisting non-majors in finding pleasure and enjoyment in music and in understanding the influence of music on contemporary life. Introduces students to principles of music composition useful in analyzing film scores.

PHIL 190 6. Zombie 101
This course is an introduction to philosophy via the zombie. Part of the course is dedicated to raising philosophical questions about zombies. (What is undeath? Is it bad? Are zombies evil?) We also use zombies of various types as thought experiments to help us answer some classic problems in philosophy. One of these is the problem of personal identity. (What makes a person one and the same through time? Is it having the same body? The same mind?) Another is the mind-body problem. (Is consciousness necessarily some non-physical aspect of ourselves?) Finally, we ask what conceptions of the good life we find represented in zombie movies. In addition to these philosophically oriented discussions, we dedicate three weeks solely to the discussion of some of the movies students are required to watch. Develops analytical skills, covers concept of genre.

PHIL 310. Special Topics in Philosophy: Philosophy and Film
Utilizing both viewings and discussion, Philosophy Through Film promotes the appreciation of films of philosophical and artistic merit. Students gain experience identifying and articulating philosophical questions and positions in cinema and thinking critically about those questions and theses. They also develop and refine their capacities to view other forms of art and media in a philosophical way while becoming more astute and careful observers and interpreters. Develops analytical skills.

SOAN 117 Social Problems in The Wire
This course provides an introduction to contemporary social problems by using a sociological perspective to analyze problems depicted in HBO’s The Wire. The focus is on problems in American society, including poverty, racism, gender inequality, gangs, drugs, education, and family. Through heavy use of multimedia (including watching The Wire), students learn basic sociological concepts and the causes and consequences of enduring social problems. Covers cultural context and develops analytical skills.

SOAN 365. Ethnographic and Documentary Film and Filmmaking
This course equips students with the basic knowledge and skills to produce their own ethnographic/documentary film. Students explore film theory from the field of visual anthropology and from filmmakers’ written reflections on the processes involved in completing particular film projects. Students view a series of early, classical, and contemporary documentaries to critique filmmakers’ representation of cultural difference, and to consider cinema vérité vs. explicit message, the strengths and limits of the notion of objectivity, the ethics of filmmaking, and concerns about audience reaction. Each student learns camera use and film editing techniques to complete a documentary. Covers the history of a specific type of film and provides skills development in the practice of filmmaking.

SPAN 190.5 Through the Spanish Lens: Contemporary Spanish Society and Culture Through Cinema
This tutorial is intended to give students the opportunity to explore Spanish society and culture through a number of Spanish movies from the 1970s to the present. Students will learn about major historical developments, such as the Spanish Civil War, the Postwar and the Franco dictatorship period, and they will gain a deeper understanding of the complex meaning of Spanish democracy today. To this purpose, students will watch movies in the four official languages in Spain: Basque, Catalan, Spanish, and Galician, and class will be devoted to the discussion of topics that are relevant to Spanish history in the global context. Covers cultural context and develops analytical skills; non-American film.

SPAN 300.10 Spanish Crime Fiction: Femmes Fatales, Murderers, and Other Outcasts
The primary focus of this course is to introduce students to the origins, developments, distinguishing elements, and ideological uses of Spanish noir and detective fiction. The course includes a selection of primary works in literature and cinema from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present, as well as critical articles that analyze these genres from different perspectives (History, Sociology, Psychology, Gender). The authors included are Pedro Ruiz de Alarcón, Dolores Redondo, Patricia Ferreira and Enrique Urbizu, among others. The main objectives of this interdisciplinary course are two. First, to give students a better understanding of the use of this broad genre as a cultural space to discuss, denounce, and advance social and political issues at a national and global level. Second, to provide them with the basic tools to analyze the selected works critically and logically. Particular attention will be given to gender role representation, aesthetics and leitmotifs. The course will include theoretical exposition, collective discussion of primary works and secondary readings, weekly written exchanges in our Wikispace, 1 oral presentation, and a final group project. This course is taught in the target language. Pre-requisite: SPAN 350 or permission of instructor. Covers cultural context and develops analytical skills, explores the concept of genre; non-American film.

SPAN 368. Special Topics in Hispanic Cinema and Literature
Course designed for students who want to improve their conversational abilities in Spanish while acquiring the basic tools to analyze filmic texts. A variety of films and literary selections from Latin America and Spain will be the basis for classroom activities that relate to particular aspects of the Hispanic world. Students will work collaboratively in a variety of settings (dialogues, interviews, film reviews, group discussions, and oral presentations). This class will be conducted in Spanish. This course is taught in the target language. Co-requisite: In order to be eligible to enroll in this course, the student must simultaneously be enrolled in SPAN 250 or SPAN 350 with permission of instructor. Covers cultural context and develops analytical skills; non-American film.

SPAN 370. The Child in Contemporary Latin American Literature and Film
This course examines the use of child characters/narrators in contemporary Latin American narrative and film in order to explore questions related to the role of the child’s voice within the text and the view of childhood in Latin America’s cultural production. It will feature films, short stories, and novels by well-known authors from various regions within Latin America (including Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Uruguay, and Puerto Rico). Both the texts and the films will be studied within the historical, social, and political context in which they were produced. This course will be taught in the target language. Covers cultural context and develops analytical skills; non-American film.

THEA 126. Introduction to Technical Theatre
Foundation course for all production work covering the organization and use of technical elements utilized in the performing arts, especially scenery, lighting, and stage management. Lab required. Develops skills that can be applied to filmmaking.

THEA 210. Beginning Acting
Investigation into the basics of acting: development of the actor’s personal perception and understanding of script and character analysis. Various training techniques incorporating group and solo performance are utilized to enhance creative expression and interpretation. The standard concepts of Stanislavski provide the basis for all work. Introduces principles and develops skills relevant to film acting.

THEA 220 Movement
Theory and practice in training the body to serve as a means of communication for the actor. Individual and group experiences will enhance actor freedom, creative expression, and dynamics of performance. Emphasis will be placed on the movement and performance techniques of Alexander, Feldenkrais, and Berry. Prerequisite: THEA 210 or permission of instructor. Develops skills especially relevant to film acting.

THEA 369/ENG 318. Playwriting
A study of the nature and process of playwriting as an art form. Students will analyze traditional play structure, and complete a series of writing assignments, culminating in the completion of two one-act plays. On a weekly basis students will be expected to produce original work and respond articulately to other writing. Prerequisite: ENG 105 and one college theatre or college creative writing course. Develops skills relevant to screenwriting.

THEA 380. Directing for the Stage
Principles and practice of directing for the beginning director: class discussion of directing theory, the director’s approach to the script, and laboratory experience in directing scenes. Prerequisite: THEA 126 and THEA 210. Develops skills that can be applied to filmmaking.

WGS 300.2 / JO 300.2 Women and Media
This course examines representations of women in the media and concepts of female identity with an emphasis on research methodology. Feminist media theory will be used to analyze and critique print and broadcast news media, advertising, depictions of female sexuality, television and film. Analysis will consider the impact of issues such as race, class and sexual orientation; identify and evaluate stereotypes of women; and engage students to think critically about the impact of popular culture on personal and societal values. It will also explore the role of women as media consumers and the importance of women media-makers. Also listed as JOUR 300.2. Covers cultural context and develops analytical skills.