Fall 2021

Honors Seminars (first- and second-year honors students)

Course Code Name Instructor
BWS 201.1 Comparing Medical Professions Cross-Nationally Quaye

Is medicine dying as a profession? How is the professional power of physicians developed in different kinds of societies? Are the forms taken to strengthen or limit professional power different in societies with different contrasting political economies? Is state power central in the analysis of professional power? What is the relationship between the state and the medical profession and where are doctors better off? In this tutorial we will examine the changing status of the medical profession in six countries - the United States, Britain, Sweden, Germany, Netherlands and Canada. We will explore the extent to which nation states have singled out the profession guilds for control. Readings will include McKinley’s and Hafferty’s The Changing Medical Profession, Kruase’s Death of the Guilds, and OECD’s Internal Markets in the Making.

Course Code Name Instructor
SOAN 200.2 Conspiracies, Cults, Experts: A Sociological Exploration of Belief and Trust
Yalçinkaya

“Nobody trusts anyone anymore,” many people say these days. Topics ranging from climate change to masking and vaccination appear to divide the public, and unusual beliefs and theories seem to attract lots of people. Even have flat-earthers are back! Meanwhile, studies find declining levels of public trust in institutions like political parties, businesses, the media, as well as higher education. These trends aren’t observed only in a few societies, and some claim that we are experiencing a global crisis of trust, which COVID only made worse.

Why people believe in certain things (but not others) and trust particular people (but not others) is a topic sociologists have been studying for decades, and this course is an exploration of their findings and arguments. We will look at studies from around the world, and learn what people believe and trust in different societies. Then we will explore the factors that influence levels of social trust, and analyze what attracts people to different ideas and belief systems. We will also look at case studies about periods in which panic erupted due to worries like alien abductions, foreign infiltrators, cults and brainwashing. Finally, we will focus on theories about why many members of the public have less faith in experts and institutions in contemporary societies.

Honors Courses (open to all honors students)

Course Code Name Instructor
PG 300.37 Public Opinion
Mack

This course explores the structure and dynamics of public opinion, providing an in-depth introduction to the factors that shape citizens’ social and political attitudes in the United States. We will focus our analysis in three major areas: definitions of public opinion and theories of opinion formation, how public opinion is influenced and how public opinion is collected and analyzed in the contemporary American political scene. We will create our own public opinion survey and collect data on the political attitudes at OWU. Our analysis will draw heavily both on readings in public opinion and current research in political behavior, allowing us to examine important political phenomena from a variety of perspectives. Ultimately, the goal of this course is for students to understand how the forces that shape American beliefs, attitudes, and opinions are gathered and how these attitudes and opinions translate into legislative outcomes.

Honors in Course Options (honors students can enroll in H option)

Course Code Name Instructor
ART 358 Ceramics I
Bogdanov

Design, construction, glazing, and firing of ceramics; the chemistry of glazes and simple geology of clay. The class alternates throwing and handbuilding techniques from one semester to the next. Prerequisite: ART 113 or consent of instructor. Fall, Spring (Group IV) ($75 studio fee.)

Course Code Name Instructor
ART 368 Ceramics II
Bogdanov

The second-semester student studies the alternate technique. The more advanced student defines and carries out his/her individual exploration of particular directions and is more involved with the daily classroom operation. Fall, Spring (Group IV) ($75 studio fee.)

Course Code Name Instructor
ENG 145 Imagining America
Caplan

American literature imagines America. It seeks to understand the country’s greatest possibilities and most pressing challenges. In this class we will read novels, short stories, poems, and nonfictional works by authors as different as Anne Bradstreet, Frederick Douglass, Nathaniel West, and Claudia Rankine that take up this urgent task in order to understand better the country where we live and the stories we tell about it. H option. Diversity and R requirement.

Course Code Name Instructor
ENG 176 The Hero(ine) Sets Forth: Quest Narratives
DeMarco

“It’s a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there’s no knowing where you might be swept off to” – Bilbo Baggins

In this class, we’ll study a range of ‘quest’ narratives, stories in which heroes and heroines set forth on challenging journeys of self discovery. We’ll explore the ways in which “leaving home” provides the questing hero/ine opportunities to (re)define the self, experience passionate love, reconfigure relationships to friends and family, and prove oneself in challenges both martial and mental. While many of these tales express an optimistic belief that trials can be overcome regardless of what troubles us – the loss of a loved one, the betrayal of a friend, or tragic errors of judgment – the “return home” of several quest narratives is complicated by darker notes of tragedy.

We’ll explore these and related themes as we study the finest and most famous quest narratives of the Middle Ages including Marie de France’s Celtic tales of love, chivalry and magic, Sir Thomas Malory’s Quest for the Holy Grail, and two tales of orphaned children on a quest to discover their identities, Sir Degare, and Freine. The medieval quest narrative has exercised a profound impact on subsequent literature and film, and to enrich our understanding of our continued fascination with this genre, we’ll view a few modern films. We’re likely to screen Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Stardust and Mad Max: Fury Road.

Course Code Name Instructor
PG 372 Democracy and Its Critics Biser

Threats to democracy are both real and urgent. In this course, we will take up the question of how to understand democracy’s complex history and potential future. The course is divided into three units. In the first, we will look at the historical evolution of democracy and its core concepts, including the ideas of popular sovereignty and representation. Is democracy merely a method of choosing our rulers by means of competitive elections, or is it something more? In the second unit, we will turn to the works of some of the most famous critics of democratic rule. In particular, Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America will offer a site through which to investigate some of the major critiques of democracy. For instance, how can democratic societies reconcile the competing demands of freedom and equality? Do we really want the people to rule? The final unit takes up contemporary challenges to democracy—from those posed by the rise of social media to the declining trust in elections. To what extent, we will ask, is democracy is still a meaningful political concept—one that we can use to describe, evaluate and criticize our current political institutions and practices?

Course Code Name Instructor
SPAN 350 Artistic Expressions of the Hispanic World
Paris-Huesca

This intermediate-advanced level course will introduce students to a variety of artistic texts (including literature, painting, and cinema) as well as other cultural materials from the Spanish-speaking world. This will allow students to gain a greater appreciation for the artistic expressions of the Hispanic world and the historical context to which they belong, while building their linguistic, communicative, critical and analytical skills.

Prerequisite: SPAN 225 or placement above 225. Diversity. Group III.

Course Code Name Instructor
SPAN 367 Spanish Literature and Culture from the 1800s to the Present Paris-Huesca

This course examines Spanish literature and culture from 1800s to the present. The course will focus on short story, poetry, drama, essay, novel, and cinema in relation to the major literary movements and periods in Spain (romanticism, pre-modernism, realism, naturalism, vanguardias, civil war, postwar, democracy, and new millennium). Among the authors included are Emilia P. Bazán, Gustavo A. Bécquer, Benito P. Galdós, Vicente Huidobro, Pedro Almodóvar, Federico G. Lorca, Antonio and Manuel Machado, Carmen M. Gaite, and Luis Buñuel. The goal is to help students develop an extensive knowledge of the selected works within a broader socio-political and cultural national and global context, to enhance their skills in the Spanish language, and to develop a critical and analytical thought. Theoretical exposition will be combined with collective discussion based on active and spontaneous participation, weekly readings and comprehension handouts, and oral presentations. The course follows an interdisciplinary approach to the study of literature, with additional emphasis on cinema. A selection of documentaries, paintings, journal articles, artistic adaptations, and other forms of popular culture will be used along with the main texts to familiarize students with the cultural developments of the Spanish literary and visual art scene. Prerequisite: Any three of SPAN 226, 250, 310, or 350 or permission of instructor. Group III Humanities/Literature. Diversity.

Seminars Required In Conjunction With the Honors Research Project (490h) To Meet Requirements to Graduate With Honors.

Course Code Name Unit Info
HONS 300.11 Honors Research and Inquiry Seminar
0.25-unit seminar

This course is designed to be taken the semester preceding the senior honors project (490H). In this course, students will first identify an area of inquiry and a faculty member who will serve as their honors research mentor. Students will begin to formulate a research thesis or define a creative project and learn how to conduct relevant background research in different disciplines. The seminar will culminate in an honors project proposal to be submitted to the honors program that is developed in collaboration with a student’s thesis mentor. The process will include peer- review from fellow honors students in the seminar.

Course Code Name Unit Info
HONS 300.12 Honors Capstone Seminar
0.25-unit seminar

This course is taken in the same semester as the senior honors project (490H). Students will meet weekly to share their progress and their scholarly work with fellow honors students. This course allows students to practice their oral and written communication skills about their scholarly or creative works to a diverse audience without close knowledge of their discipline. The course also provides opportunities for students to practice scholarly discourse across disciplinary boundaries.


Spring 2022

Honors Seminars (first- and second-year honors students)

Course Code Name Instructor
BOMI 190.7 Plant Signal Transduction
Wolverton

Plant seeds are amazing structures that can protect the embryonic plant for hundreds of years, but as soon as germination begins, the plant is fully committed to living or dying wherever it finds itself. To aid the young seedling in becoming rooted and established, plants perceive cues from their surroundings and adjust their growth direction and rate accordingly. Some of the signals perceived by plants include gravity, light, and moisture levels. In this tutorial, we will investigate how plants sense these cues and convert them into signals that result in growth responses. Students will learn how to isolate plant DNA, perform PCR using that DNA, and confirm PCR products using gel electrophoresis. Students will use computer image analysis to collect data on the growth of plants with mutations in genes important in signal sensing and growth responses. Students will also monitor gene expression in plants using confocal microscopy. Along the way, students will gain valuable experience in laboratory techniques, including the cultivation of plants, tissue culture, media preparation, and basic recombinant DNA techniques. No previous experience is necessary or expected.

Course Code Name Instructor
DANCE 190.2 Dance Film: A Calculated Framing of Bodies
Smith

“Dance Film - A Calculated Framing of Bodies” examines the relationship between human movement and the camera – whether for artistic reasons or utilitarian ones – as a means for understanding bodies in motion, human relationships, and culture. Class meetings will be devoted to the review and discussion of pivotal projects and will cover the role of film and video in dance film festivals, art installations, theatre and dance performances, and the field of medical science. Field trips to exhibits, performances, and medical centers will be a valuable component of the tutorial. Students will further research work that aligns with their own interests and will ultimately present their research in the form of a paper or video project to be presented at the end of the semester. Writing option available. Group IV. This course also counts towards a Film Studies major.

Course Code Name Instructor
ENVS 200.1 The Science Behind the Environmental Classics
Anderson

Certain great books have played key roles in capturing public attention and motivating citizen action in the modern environmental movement. This course will use these books as inspirations for in-depth study of the scientific ideas that underlie the ongoing environmental issues discussed in each text. For example, students may read Silent Spring by Rachel Carson while studying pesticide effects on the environment and Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez to motivate an examination of how climate change affects the Arctic landscape. Newer works are also sparking interesting conversations among environmental scientists, such as Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer, which explores the merging of Native American and western science perspectives on nature, and Merchants of Doubt by Naomi Oreskes, which documents organized deception on climate change by the fossil fuel industry. Scientific papers on the topics in each environmental book will also be assigned and students will discuss the status of scientific knowledge on each environmental issue at the time each book was written as compared to our current understanding. We will also consider the importance of these books in the environmental movement and discuss the different roles that science and literature play in our human understanding, exploration and reactions to the natural landscape and environmental crisis.

Course Code Name Instructor
PHIL 201.1 Zombie 101: What the Undead Teach
Flynn

This course is an introduction to philosophy via the undead. With their help, we will take up a number of philosophical questions, including the following. Is death bad? Is undeath worse? Does human life have meaning? Would the life of a zombie be any more or less meaningful? What, if anything, makes a person one-and-the-same through time? Could a person become a zombie or would that simply be the end of them? Is the mind or consciousness a necessarily non-physical aspect of us? Could a perfect physical replica of us be unconscious? Would immortality be good (for us)? Might an immortal have good reason for becoming mortal? Along the way we will watch a number of movies having in one way or another to do with the undead and with the philosophical themes we wish to take up. We will dedicate some weeks to the discussion of these movies, not confining ourselves to the philosophical questions they may raise.

Course Code Name Instructor
ZOOL 201.2 The Science Behind the Times
Markwardt

In this seminar, students will select a topic of interest form the Science section of the New York Times. They will then develop and deliver teaching materials and guide our discussion to help the class understand the science “behind” these fascinating stories in the popular press.

Honors Courses (open to all honors students)

Course Code Name Instructor
HIST 386C History and Fiction in Modern America
Flamm

Historical fiction is a popular window into the American past. But does it illuminate or distort our understanding of modern history? Does the quality of a novel reflect how closely the author conforms to the historical record or how greatly he or she transcends it? Do certain genres of historical fiction, such as war novels, capture the essence of events in ways that nonfiction accounts cannot? Are some periods of historical fiction richer than others? Is all history fiction to a degree? These are among the issues this seminar will consider.

Honors in Course Options (honors students can enroll in H option)

Course Code Name Instructor
ART 358 Ceramics I
Bogdanov

Design, construction, glazing, and firing of ceramics; the chemistry of glazes and simple geology of clay. The class alternates throwing and handbuilding techniques from one semester to the next. Prerequisite: ART 113 or consent of instructor. Fall, Spring (Group IV) ($75 studio fee.)

Course Code Name Instructor
ART 368 Ceramics II
Bogdanov

The second-semester student studies the alternate technique. The more advanced student defines and carries out his/her individual exploration of particular directions and is more involved with the daily classroom operation. Fall, Spring (Group IV) ($75 studio fee.)

Course Code Name Instructor
ENG 346 Eighteenth-Century Literature in the Digital Age
Merkel

Before Wikipedia, there was Diderot’s massive Encyclopédie. Long before social media, there were social networks of letter writers. And before Salon.com, the salons of Madame Necker and Madame Geoffrin.This is a course devoted to the long 18th-century where students can inhabit the drama of Enlightenment thought through digital projects. Our approach to studying the cultural age emphasizes participation. In addition to studying major genres, we consider the cross-cultural friendships and artistic collaborations among thinkers, writers, and artists -- both the privileged and the powerless. In seminar-format class discussions, students explore the relevance of 18th-century studies for understanding 21st-century problems, questions, and issues. Students read Catherine the Great, Diderot, Voltaire, Sterne, Goethe, and Pushkin, as they actively seek out under-represented participants and forms of participation, such as female virtuosity in the genre of letter writing.

Coursework requires students to apply digital tools in the humanities to eighteenth-century studies. Final project in the course is a public-facing, collaborative project mapping female participation and virtuosity in the genre of letter writing.

Course Code Name Instructor
NUTR 300.11 Human Nutrition and Metabolism
Nix

This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of food, nutrients and how nutrients are digested, absorbed and used in the body. This course builds on previous content covered in Introduction to Nutrition, but will take a more physiological and biochemical approach to nutrition processes. We will outline complex metabolic pathways as well as functions of various micronutrients. In addition, we will find and utilize current scientific literature to write a review of a specific topic related to a nutrient.

Seminars Associated With the Honors Research Project (490h), Usually Taken During Junior and Senior Years.

Course Code Name Unit Info
HONS 300.11 Honors Research and Inquiry Seminar
0.25-unit seminar

This course is designed to be taken the semester preceding the senior honors project (490H). In this course, students will first identify an area of inquiry and a faculty member who will serve as their honors research mentor. Students will begin to formulate a research thesis or define a creative project and learn how to conduct relevant background research in different disciplines. The seminar will culminate in an honors project proposal to be submitted to the honors program that is developed in collaboration with a student’s thesis mentor. The process will include peer- review from fellow honors students in the seminar.

Course Code Name Unit Info
HONS 300.12 Honors Capstone Seminar
0.25-unit seminar

This course is taken in the same semester as the senior honors project (490H). Students will meet weekly to share their progress and their scholarly work with fellow honors students. This course allows students to practice their oral and written communication skills about their scholarly or creative works to a diverse audience without close knowledge of their discipline. The course also provides opportunities for students to practice scholarly discourse across disciplinary boundaries.

Contact Info

Location

Honors Office
Phillips Hall #214
Ohio Wesleyan University
Delaware, OH 43015
P 740-368-3562
P 740-368-3886
F 740-368-3553