The UC 160 curriculum offers challenging themes for every incoming student. Check out the theme descriptions below for all of the details:

Fall 2017

The Artist’s Life

What does it mean to see art in the everyday? How do we create—and more importantly, maintain—a creative and balanced life? What does it mean to be an artist, and what is the holistic benefit of creativity and play? This course will function as a primer in learning to balance the intricacies of adult life with the pursuit of creativity, for while college is a natural stepping stone in the progression towards adulthood, an education in the liberal arts—and a fulfilling adult life—hinges on finding new ways to think creatively and engage the very elements that made childhood so rewarding. This course will introduce the idea that choosing creativity and actively pursuing your artistic passions need not conflict with the rigors of academia and vocation, but rather, enhance these pursuits tenfold. We’ll also explore how the elements of a liberal arts education—and the programs, community, and intellectual framework of Ohio Wesleyan, specifically—will help you make the most of not only your first year on campus, but the duration of your four years. This highly interactive course will offer varied experiences, readings, and group activities to provide a means of experiencing how and why creativity and play is such an essential function of human existence.

The Entrepreneurial Spirit

Entrepreneurship is about pursuing opportunities.  It involves the process of identifying a need, sourcing and organizing the required resources, and the willingness to receive both the risks and rewards associated with the venture.  That venture’s success rests on its ability to create social, political, or economic value.  Anyone can pursue opportunities and create value whether you are an actor, computer scientist, philosopher, teacher or interested in any other course of study in the liberal arts.  In this section, students will learn success strategies in the context of an entrepreneurial mindset. The course will help you develop attitudes and behaviors that better prepare you to take advantage of opportunities, overcome adversity, thirst for knowledge, build your personal brand, and think critically and creatively.

  • Section 1, Doug Bennett, Mon. 12:10 p.m.
  • Section 12, Megan Ellis, Tues. 3:10 p.m.
  • Section 14, Dan Charna, Wed. 12:10 p.m.

More than a Stereotype

Have you ever thought that you were not “good enough” at something?  Maybe you thought you didn’t belong in a certain situation, or that everyone else was more prepared for an exam or smarter than you. This course examines how stereotypes, more specifically, stereotype threats, impact our identities and our beliefs in abilities, and how we can lessen these threats and thrive.

Science, Skepticism & Society

We often say things like “97% of scientists believe that climate change is real, so it’s scientific fact” or “Evolution is science, creationism is pseudoscience”.  What do we mean by that?  What’s with those people who don’t want to vaccinate their kids or don’t want to eat genetically modified food?   Do they have a point?  What is a scientific fact? Aren’t scientists wrong a lot?  Can we trust what they say?  What are the benefits and limitations of the scientific way of thinking?  How does this impact our lives in the classroom, in the courtroom, and in politics?  This section is open to all students interested in learning about the role of science in our society, whether or not they intend to select a major in the sciences.

Social Justice, Service, and Learning in the Community

An exploration of our motives, beliefs, and values as well as our assumptions/biases regarding social justice, civic engagement, and service learning.  Situated in a framework emphasizing community organization, service learning and leadership, students will be empowered to create change through taking action in the local Delaware and Columbus communities.

  • Section 2, Lisa Ho, Mon. 12:10 p.m., LGBTQ+ Interest
  • Section 5, JD Durst, Mon. 3:10 p.m.
  • Section 10, Paula White, Tues. 12:10 p.m.
  • Section 16, Paul Kostyu, Wed. 12:10 p.m.
  • Section 19, Paul Dean, Wed. 3:10 p.m., First Generation Students

The Ticket to Travel 

An OWU education opens many doors, including the door to travel.  These sections of UC 160 will focus on the ways that travel complements a liberal arts education and the opportunities to explore the world beyond your comfort zone, whether that takes place in a different country or a few miles from your home.

  • Section 8, Kirsta Cobb, Tues. 12:10 p.m.
  • Section 9, Annie Stinemetz, Tues. 12:10 p.m.
  • Section 11, Ellen Arnold, Tues. 3:10 p.m.
  • Section 18, Nancy Comorau, Wed. 3:10 p.m.
  • Section 22, David Eastman, Thurs. 12:10 p.m., Honors Students
  • Section 24, Mark Gingerich, Thurs. 3:10 p.m.
  • Section 29, Michael Flamm, Fri. 12:10 p.m., Honors Students

Vocation

In picking a major or a career, is it more important to follow your head or your heart? Is it enough for work to be personally satisfying or should it also benefit others? What if the work you feel called to do is unsupported by the marketplace? What if you simply don’t know what you want to do? “Vocation” comes from the Latin word voco, a “call” or “summons,” and originally meant a calling to serve in religious orders, although nowadays the word is used to mean any kind of higher purpose one feels bound to pursue. In these sections, we will explore the relationship between the liberal arts and vocation by reading distinguished authors and by talking with class visitors about how they came to do what they do and why.


Spring 2018

The Artist’s Life

What does it mean to see art in the everyday? How do we create—and more importantly, maintain—a creative and balanced life? What does it mean to be an artist, and what is the holistic benefit of creativity and play? This course will function as a primer in learning to balance the intricacies of adult life with the pursuit of creativity, for while college is a natural stepping stone in the progression towards adulthood, an education in the liberal arts—and a fulfilling adult life—hinges on finding new ways to think creatively and engage the very elements that made childhood so rewarding. This course will introduce the idea that choosing creativity and actively pursuing your artistic passions need not conflict with the rigors of academia and vocation, but rather, enhance these pursuits tenfold. We’ll also explore how the elements of a liberal arts education—and the programs, community, and intellectual framework of Ohio Wesleyan, specifically—will help you make the most of not only your first year on campus, but the duration of your four years. This highly interactive course will offer varied experiences, readings, and group activities to provide a means of experiencing how and why creativity and play is such an essential function of human existence.

  • Section 3, Stephanie Merkel, Tues. 12:10 p.m.

Social Justice, Service, and Learning in the Community

An exploration of our motives, beliefs, and values as well as our assumptions/biases regarding social justice, civic engagement, and service learning.  Situated in a framework emphasizing community organization, service learning and leadership, students will be empowered to create change through taking action in the local Delaware and Columbus communities.

  • Section 2, Sally Leber, Mon. 3:10 p.m.

Vocation

In picking a major or a career, is it more important to follow your head or your heart? Is it enough for work to be personally satisfying or should it also benefit others? What if the work you feel called to do is unsupported by the marketplace? What if you simply don’t know what you want to do? “Vocation” comes from the Latin word voco, a “call” or “summons,” and originally meant a calling to serve in religious orders, although nowadays the word is used to mean any kind of higher purpose one feels bound to pursue. In these sections, we will explore the relationship between the liberal arts and vocation by reading distinguished authors and by talking with class visitors about how they came to do what they do and why.

 


Special Section Designation Descriptions

  • Dance/Theatre Improvisation Focus:  Course activities will include techniques for heightening awareness, calming, and connecting through movement improvisation
  • First Generation Sections:  For students whose parents do not have a college degree
  • First Year Foundations Sections:  Students in these sections will participate in additional activities designed to help them discern their career, vocational, academic & college success goals
  • Honors Sections:  Reserved for students who have been admitted to the Honors Program
  • LGBTQ+ Section:  Open to all students; will focus on issues related to LGBTQ+ concerns
  • Transfer Sections:  Reserved for students who have attended another college full time prior to OWU

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