The UC 160 curriculum offers challenging themes for every incoming student. Check out the theme descriptions below for all of the details:

Fall 2018

Arts and Activism

Humanity has a longstanding history of utilizing and employing different mediums of art such as dance, painting, sculpting, theater, performance, drawing, writing, photography, and other creative works, that engage and initiate social transformation. What does it mean to see and use art every day, and how does artistic self-expression benefit culture and community? How does this focus translate into meaningful and holistic dialogues with one another at the University? This course focuses on the different ways creative arts and self-expression promote dialogue and ultimately benefit society and culture. Students will have the opportunity to interact with award-winning artists and New York Times bestselling authors.

  • Section 6, Maureen Reese, Mon. 3:10
  • Section 11, Scott Kelly, Tues. 3:10
  • Section 17, Amy Butcher, Wed. 3:10
  • Section 23, Brad Pulcini, Thurs. 3:10, First Generation Students
  • Section 27, Bradford Sadler, Fri. 12:10

Express Yourself

Higher education is a conversation – with the works you explore, with faculty, and with your fellow students. Your ability to communicate – speaking, writing, listening – will be critical to your success in every aspect of college life. Yet, technology is transforming conversation and how we explore and exchange ideas. This class will examine the liberal arts and opportunities at OWU through the lens of communication and conversation. On a 2018 college campus, what are our obligations as listeners and viewers? How does technology influence how, how often, and how effectively we communicate, both here on campus and in other areas of our lives? How can we best explore and exchange ideas? What cultural and technological obstacles stand in the way of deep conversation, and how can we communicate most effectively?

This I Believe

What beliefs are important to you and why? How do your beliefs fit in a complex, global society? How could your core values influence your choice of major and the co-curricular activities in which you engage? How could your beliefs help inform your intellectual and personal growth? In this course we will explore these questions while helping you connect to OWU and setting you on a path to a rewarding college experience.

  • Section 10, David Counselman, Tues. 12:10, Honors
  • Section 13, Nancy Bihl Rutkowski, Tues. 3:10
  • Section 25, Dorota Kendrick, Thurs. 3:10
  • Section 30, Danielle Hamill, Fri. 3:10

In Search of Identity

Who are you? Who have you been? Who do you want to be? College is a time for discovery and reinvention, for exploration and transition. This course will help you explore the various facets of your identity from becoming an adult to thinking about what a potential major means for you. Over the course of the semester, we’ll look both at individual social and cultural identities as well as what it means to identify as a member of a community. We’ll also consider how our identities influence our sense of meaning and purpose in our lives.

  • Section 7, Lisa Ho, Tues., 12:10, LGBTQ+ Interest
  • Section 12, Chad Johns, Tues. 3:10, Honors
  • Section 22, Kirsta Cobb, Thurs. 12:10
  • Section 29, Ji Young Choi, Fri. 3:10

Culture Matters

What is culture? It is the food we eat. It is the music we listen to. It is the clothes we wear, the languages we speak, the belief systems to which we ascribe. Culture, whether popular or high, nationalistic or foreign, or anything in between, shapes us just as we shape it. In this UC 160 course, you will explore the theme of “culture” and the idea of cultural identity in the contemporary world. This theme is particularly appropriate for students interested in connecting to study-abroad and travel learning opportunities, engaging in discussions of identity and belonging across cultures, as well as becoming more knowledgeable of issues we face as a global culture and appreciative of ourselves as global citizens.

  • Section 2, Andrea Colvin, Mon. 12:10
  • Section 5, Mary Anne Lewis Cusato & Nathan Amador Rowley, Mon. 3:10, Global Scholars
  • Section 21, Annie Stinemetz, Thurs. 12:10
  • Section 24, Eva Paris-Huesca, Thurs. 3:10, Honors
  • Section 26, Mark Gingerich, Fri. 12:10

The Entrepreneurial Spirit

Entrepreneurship is about pursuing opportunities. It involves the process of identifying a need, sourcing and organizing the required resources, and the willingness to receive both the risks and rewards associated with the venture. That venture’s success rests on its ability to create social, political, or economic value. Anyone can pursue opportunities and create value whether you are an actor, computer scientist, philosopher, teacher or interested in any other course of study in the liberal arts. In this section, students will learn success strategies in the context of an entrepreneurial mindset. The course will help you develop attitudes and behaviors that better prepare you to take advantage of opportunities, overcome adversity, thirst for knowledge, build your personal brand, and think critically and creatively.

  • Section 1, Megan Ellis, Mon. 12:10
  • Section 9, Doug Bennett, Tues. 12:10
  • Section 14, Dan Charna, Wed. 12:10

Science, Skepticism & Society

We often hear statements such as “97% of scientists believe that climate change is real, so it’s a scientific fact,” or “Evolution is science, creationism is pseudoscience.” Some people don’t want to vaccinate their kids or eat genetically-modified food. What is a scientific fact? Why are we at times skeptical about what is purported to be a scientific consensus? How do science and scientific skepticism impact our lives in the classroom, in the court room, and in politics? How do media affect our attitudes and understanding of these issues? You don’t have to be a science major to examine the role of science in our society.

  • Section 16, Amy Downing, Wed. 3:10
  • Section 31, Bill Holschuh, Fri. 3:10

Social Justice and Community

What would a better world look like? How would your journey at OWU help to get us there? Through this course, we will explore our motives, beliefs, and values as well as our assumptions regarding social justice. Situated in a framework emphasizing community, service learning, and leadership, students will be empowered to take ownership of their education and act locally.

  • Section 3, Dawn Chisebe, Mon. 12:10, First Generation Students
  • Section 4, JD Durst, Mon. 3:10
  • Section 15, Lauren Wright, Wed. 12:10
  • Section 18, Barbara Terzian, Wed. 3:10
  • Section 19, Paul Dean, Thurs 12:10, First Generation Students, SOAN 117 co-requisite

Spring 2019

Express Yourself

Higher education is a conversation – with the works you explore, with faculty, and with your fellow students. Your ability to communicate – speaking, writing, listening – will be critical to your success in every aspect of college life. Yet, technology is transforming conversation and how we explore and exchange ideas. This class will examine the liberal arts and opportunities at OWU through the lens of communication and conversation. On a 2018 college campus, what are our obligations as listeners and viewers? How does technology influence how, how often, and how effectively we communicate, both here on campus and in other areas of our lives? How can we best explore and exchange ideas? What cultural and technological obstacles stand in the way of deep conversation, and how can we communicate most effectively?

  • Section 2, Kellie Hall, Wed. 12:10

In Search of Identity

Who are you? Who have you been? Who do you want to be? College is a time for discovery and reinvention, for exploration and transition. This course will help you explore the various facets of your identity from becoming an adult to thinking about what a potential major means for you. Over the course of the semester, we’ll look both at individual social and cultural identities as well as what it means to identify as a member of a community. We’ll also consider how our identities influence our sense of meaning and purpose in our lives.

  • Section 3, Sally Leber, Tues., 3:10

The Entrepreneurial Spirit

Entrepreneurship is about pursuing opportunities. It involves the process of identifying a need, sourcing and organizing the required resources, and the willingness to receive both the risks and rewards associated with the venture. That venture’s success rests on its ability to create social, political, or economic value. Anyone can pursue opportunities and create value whether you are an actor, computer scientist, philosopher, teacher or interested in any other course of study in the liberal arts. In this section, students will learn success strategies in the context of an entrepreneurial mindset. The course will help you develop attitudes and behaviors that better prepare you to take advantage of opportunities, overcome adversity, thirst for knowledge, build your personal brand, and think critically and creatively.

  • Section 1, Barbara MacLeod, Mon. 3:10

Special Section Designation Descriptions

  • Dance/Theatre Improvisation Focus: Course activities will include techniques for heightening awareness, calming, and connecting through movement improvisation
  • First Generation Sections: For students whose parents do not have a college degree
  • Global Scholars Section: Reserved for students who have been admitted to the Global Scholars Program
  • Honors Sections: Reserved for students who have been admitted to the Honors Program
  • LGBTQ+ Interest: Open to all students; will focus on issues related to LGBTQ+ concerns

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