OWU Statement of Technology Integration to Support Student Learning

The OWU Department of Education meets all the standards set forth by Council for the Accreditation of Education Professionals (CAEP).One of the CAEP standards states that…candidates model and apply technology standards as they design, implement and assess learning experiences to engage students and improve learning; and enrich professional practice.

More specifically, CAEP articulates the following:

Candidates need experiences during their preparation to become proficient in applications of digital media and technological capabilities. They should have opportunities to develop the skills and dispositions for accessing online research databases, digital media, and tools and to identify research-based practices that can improve their students’ learning, engagement, and outcomes. They should know why and how to help their students access and assess critically the quality and relevance of digital academic content. Preparation experiences should allow candidates to demonstrate their abilities to design and facilitate digital or connected learning, mentoring, and collaboration. They should encourage use of social networks as resources for these purposes and to help identify digital content and technology tools for P‐12 students’ learning. Candidates should help their students gain access to what technology has to offer. (CAEP, pg. 30)

CAEP Proficiency & ISTE Standards Courses Evidence
Candidates use online management systems (Blackboard, TK20, K-12 grading programs) to access course readings and assignments, submit their work, and/or submit grades for the students they teach. All EDUC courses

All clinical experiences: Field Experience (EDUC 329,  339, 349 or 369) AND Student Teaching (EDUC 463, 474, or 484)
Completion of assigned readings, assignments, etc.
Candidates know how to access online research databases, digital media, and tools and to identify research-based practices that can improve their students' learning, engagement, and outcomes. Methods (EDUC 321/322/323, EDUC 341 or EDUC 370)

Field Experience (EDUC 329, 339, 349 or 369)
Lesson Plans
Candidates know why and how to help their students access and assess critically the quality and relevance of digital academic content.

[ISTE Standards for Teachers – 2: Design and Develop Digital Age Learning Experiences & Assessment]

Methods (EDUC 321/322/ 323, EDUC 341 or EDUC 370) – Introduction to SAMR model.  See OWU Technology Integration:  Resources and Ideas.

Field Experience (EDUC 329, 339, 349 or 369)  – Implementation of SAMR Model.
Technology Integration I – Lesson plan from Field Experience with reflection addressing how the incorporation of technology by the candidate enhanced student learning.
Candidates demonstrate their abilities to design and facilitate digital or connected learning, mentoring, and collaboration.

[ISTE Standards for Teachers – 2: Design and Develop Digital Age Learning Experiences & Assessment]
{ISTE Standards for Students – 3: Knowledge Constructor; 6: Creative Communicator}
Student Teaching (EDUC 463, 474, or 484) – Continued implementation of SAMR model with a focus on social networks as a means to help identify digital content and technology tools for P-12 students' learning. Technology Integration II – Lesson plan from Student Teaching with reflection addressing how the incorporation of technology by the student teacher and students enhanced student learning.

Throughout each licensure program, candidates are asked to do the following:

  1. use technology (online research databases, digital media, and tools) and to identify content as well as research-based practices when designing lesson plans; and to
  2. create lesson plans that use educational technology to support the teaching of the lesson and/or support students’ use of technology to enhance their learning.

To demonstrate competency with using technology to design lessons, candidates are required to:

  • explain in the “Pre-Instructional Planning” and/or "Technology and Online Resources" sections of the OWU lesson plan template what online resources/research they consulted to enhance their content knowledge for content being taught and/or what research they reviewed to enhance their pedagogical knowledge for the lesson being taught.

Completed Lessons will be evaluated using the Research in Planning rubric:

Research in Planning Rubric
Each category will be scored at the highest level for which the candidate meets all the criteria listed for that category.

Criteria EXCELLENT PROFICIENT ADEQUATE UNSATISFACTORY
Research in Planning Candidate consistently reviews research on effective teaching strategies and/or resources related to the content being taught and consistently incorporates the research into planning. Candidate frequently reviews research on effective teaching strategies and/or resources related to the content being taught and generally incorporates the research into planning. Candidate occasionally reviews research on effective teaching strategies and/or resources related to the content being taught and occasionally incorporates the research into planning. Candidate rarely reviews research on effective teaching strategies and/or resources related to the content being taught and/or fails to incorporate the research into planning.

Each category must be scored Adequate or better.

To demonstrate competency with using technology in the teaching/learning process, candidates are required to:

  • create technology lessons using the OWU lesson plan template; striving for the highest level of technology integration (transformation) that is developmentally appropriate for the learners and the context; and
  • reflect after teaching the lesson (in the “Reflections after Teaching” section of the OWU lesson plan template) on why/how their use of technology was or was not successful for the enhancement of student learning.

Completed Technology Lessons with reflections will be uploaded into TK20 and evaluated using the Technology Integration Lesson Plan rubric:

Technology Integration Lesson Plan Rubric

Each category will be scored at the highest level for which the candidate meets all the criteria listed for that category.

Criteria EXCELLENT PROFICIENT ADEQUATE UNSATISFACTORY
Developmentally Responsive to Learners The lesson’s proposed technology use is engaging, age appropriate for the content, fosters higher-level thinking and provides students choice in technology use. The lesson’s proposed technology use is engaging, age appropriate for the content, and fosters higher-level thinking. The lesson’s proposed technology is age appropriate for the content and supports student thinking. The lesson's proposed technology is not age appropriate for the content, and/or does not support student thinking.
Rationale Integration of Technology The reflection provides clear and specific evidence for how technology was integral to enhancing and extending student learning, such that technology allowed the teacher/students to do something that could not have been done any other way.

[SAMR Transformation: Modification or Redefinition]
The reflection provides clear and specific evidence for how technology was integral to enhancing and extending student learning such that it allows for better learning than if technology was not used.

[SAMR Transformation: Modification]
The reflection provides clear and specific evidence for how technology was used; student learning was supported, but not enhanced.

[SAMR Enhancement: Augmentation]
The reflection provides evidence that technology was substituted into the learning task; however, the lesson could have been completed without the addition of technology.

[SAMR Enhancement: Substitution]

Each category must be scored Adequate or better.          

Samples of Student Technology Projects

Preparing future teachers to use technology with their students is an important part of teacher education at Ohio Wesleyan. Dr. Amy McClure had this goal in mind when she required her Children’s Literature students to create Microsoft PowerPoint presentations on significant picture book authors and illustrators. In pairs, students researched the work of an illustrator, including how critics view that person’s work. They then created presentations that summarized the information they discovered. Each group also created a handout using Microsoft Publisher software.

Click the links below to view the presentations: